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Social Media & the Law Update 09-18-13: Upcoming PNM Class, FB ‘Like’ Constitutionally Protected

FB 'Like' Constitutionally Protected

LEGAL DISCLAIMER: The following information is provided to be just general information, and therefore, should not be taken as specific legal advice that pertains to any particular situation.  The reader should not base any decisions on the information here to act or refrain from acting regarding a legal problem.  If you believe you have a legal problem please seek legal advice from a licensed attorney in the relevant jurisdiction.
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Exciting news everyone!  My Pacific New Media (PNM) class on Social Media and the Law is next week!  So there is still plenty of time to sign-up.  Here is the general info:

Sep 25, 2013 • Wed • 7:00-9:00pm • 1 mtg • UHM Krauss 012 • $50 (SMCHI $45)

What will I be covering?  Well, as it is a general survey class, I will touching upon areas where the law has inserted itself in the social media sphere, such as today’s more exciting news.

4th Circuit Court of Appeals Rules the “Liking” on Facebook is Constitutionally Protected

For instance, like how a Facebook ‘Like” is protected by the 1st Amendment of the U.S. Constitution (i.e. it is a freedom of speech).  Today, the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals issued a ruling in favor of a former deputy sheriff who had been fired from his job due to “liking” the Facebook page of the man running in opposition to his boss.  Basically, the court felt that by “Liking” a campaign page, it was the “Internet equivalent of displaying a political sign in one’s front yard, which the Supreme Court has held is substantive speech.”  Further, the court, in its unanimous ruling, as to this Facebook issue, stated that, “On the most basic level, clicking on the ‘like’ button literally causes to be published the statement that the User ‘likes’ something, which is itself a substantive statement[.]”

To read the complete ruling, check it out here.

Other Topics at my Class

As stated in my post on Trademark Usage, I attended the ABA’s Annual Conference, so I sat in on a seminar on “Social Media Terms of Use: Case Law Round Up”.  Many of the issues discussed at that seminar are ones I will be focusing on for my PNM class, such as various social media platforms’ terms of use, policies, etc . . . . I have a Slideshare that covers basics on the differences between Policies and Contracts.   What many users fail to realize that Terms of Use are generally binding and enforceable contracts, but that a Privacy Policy tends to be just a company’s call toward a prescribed action.  This is something that social media marketers, consultants, small business owners, and those who use social media as one of their primary marketing tools should consider.  Finally, if you are a responsible decision maker for your organization/business, you really consider having internal dialogue on handling social media in general (whether it be employees, PR, marketing, etc . . .).

Anyway, that is just a sliver of one of the many topics to be covered in my class.  So if you are interested in signing up click here.

Mahalo!

-RKH

Pacific New Media Class: Social Media and the Law – March 6, 2013

Please join me at my class with Pacific New Media on Social Media and the Law next week Wednesday, March 6, from 7 – 9pm if you are interested in learning about the applicability of various laws with social media usage. I will be talking about whether you can be fired for using social media, legislative updates, and other various issues that have cropped up when the law tries to get a handle with the likes of Facebook, Twitter, and other communicative platforms.

Click on this link for more details.

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Social Media and the Law: Legislative and NLRB Updates

The following information was presented by me to the Social Media Club of Hawaii’s Social Media “Boot Camp” for Hawaii Recruiting, Staffing and Hawaii Human Resources Professionals on Friday, February 22, 2013.  You can find a downloadable pdf version on the “Resources” page of my website. Here was what was discussed:
Legislative Updates

Summary: Generally, speaking states are moving to prohibit employers from asking for usernames, passwords, and access to an employee’s or potential employee’s personal social networking account.  The argument goes that they need access to the personal accounts as a way to protect proprietary information, trade secrets, to comply with federal or trade association regulations, or to prevent an employer of being exposed to legal liability (due diligence).  The countervailing argument is that the personal account has nothing to do with one’s application to a job or doing the job, and is an invasion of privacy.  Thus far, it seems privacy advocates are carrying the day as four states last year, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, and the latest California have adopted laws that prevent employers from accessing personal social media accounts of employees or potential employees. Hawaii’s 2013 legislative session has two bills fashioned after California’s.

Federal: Representative Eliot Engel of New York has recently introduced H.R. 537, the ‘Social Networking Online Protection Act’ (SNOPA).  The bill if enacted would prohibit employers from requiring/requesting that the employee or applicant provide the employer their user name, password, or other means for accessing the employee/applicant’s private email account on any social networking website; OR discharge, discipline, discriminate in employment or promotion, or take adverse action against them for refusing/declining to provide a user name, password, or access OR if the employee/applicant files a complaint under the Act (basically asserting their right to sue to protect themselves).  Finally, it gives the US Secretary of Labor to assess a civil penalty of up to $10,000 for violations and stopping the violating actions. Further, US district courts can give relief to the affected person through employment, reinstatement, promotion, and the payment of lost wages and benefits.

State: During this 2013 Hawaii Legislative session, two bills, HB713 and SB207, work for the most part, very similar to the Federal law, and the language is based mostly on California’s recently adopted law.  I will focus on HB713 as I have worked with this bill in particular.  The current incarnation of HB713, is an HD2 that was passed out of the House Judiciary Committee, yesterday (2/21) and basically uses broad language to prohibit an employer from asking an employee or potential employee their user name, password, or trying to get access to their personal social networking account.  Currently, the HD2 would have the Hawaii Civil Rights Commission investigate a claim, and would operate similarly to any other investigation that the Commission already does for other issues under its authority. Prior variations had DLIR handle the investigation.

Bottom line:  This issue is not going away, and it is clear that as time goes on it is more likely than not employers will be denied access to personal social media accounts.  However, this still does not prevent workplace investigations and other necessary steps when there may be a violation, and the social media account is involved. For example, situations where there is workers’ compensation fraud or the wrongful transmission of trade secrets.  The best situation for employers is still likely that workers use their personal devices and personal time to do their personal social networking, and not on company time, company devices, and company email accounts. As always check with attorney or HR specialist on policies and procedures.

 

NLRB Rulings

Summary:  The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) continues to apply the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) to situations where the employer has taken adverse actions against employees due to postings on social media sites.  Further, it has frowned on overly broad social media policies by companies trying to regulate employees’ social media behaviors. However, a recent DC Court ruling has stated that President Obama’s recess appointments to the NLRB were invalid. However, this should not be taken as a sign that employers can ignore the recent rulings on social media policies and firings.

In Hispanics United Buffalo, the NLRB held that the termination of five employees due to their Facebook posts, where the company claimed harassment by the five on another employee, violated the NLRA. The posts and comments were deemed as a discussion of job performance, and dealt with the preparation of co-workers to defend against allegations of poor work.  The comments were prompted when one threatened to complain to the boss that others were not working hard enough, which in turn prompted these comments: “My fellow co-workers, how do you feel?” “Try doing my job. I have five programs,” “What the hell, we don’t have a life as is,” as well as other expletive-laden responses. The NLRB ruled this was “concerted activity” for “mutual aid.”

However, in The Arizona Star Daily situation, a reporter that had posted Twitter comments stating that “What?!?!?! No overnight homicide. … You’re slacking, Tucson.” Another began, “You stay homicidal, Tucson.” was not protected as those comments were offensive, and not concerted activity, nor about working conditions.  Similarly, an Illinois bartender fired for posting on his Facebook that he was unhappy about not receiving a raise in five years and calling customers “rednecks” and that he hoped they chocked on glass as they drove home also did not meet protective-worthy status.

NLRB on Social Media Policies: Wal-Mart’s social media policy, after working with the NLRB, received praise, where it prohibits “inappropriate postings that may include discriminatory remarks, harassment and threats of violence or similar inappropriate or unlawful conduct.”  Contrast that with the finding that General Motor’s policy was unlawful for instructing that, “offensive, demeaning, abusive or inappropriate remarks are as out of place online as they are offline.”  The NLRB felt it proscribed a broad spectrum of communications that would included protected criticisms of the employer’s labor policies or treatment of employees. Similarly, Costco struck out on an overly broad blanket prohibition against employees’ posting things that “damage the company” or “any person’s reputation.”

While, it is hard to draw any clear distinctions, it does seem clear that employers should adopt social media policies that are specific rather than impose across-the-board prohibitions; the NLRB seems to take into account chilling effects on speech in concert by workers through social media platforms, especially where working conditions are touched upon. However, a worker’s general gripes and disparaging comments about customers or groups of people will less likely be protected under the NLRA.

 

Overall Reminders:  Recent court cases have indicated that a series of emails can be taken together as a contract.  Therefore, when engaging in employment activities, such as using LinkedIn, recruiters or HR persons should be careful not to make a written offer.

Also social networking is becoming a part of people’s everyday Internet interaction. By now it is clear that information is permanent when published on the web, as many people  can screen capture, take a picture with their mobile device, etc . . . so companies should take great care when using social media as delivery system for information.

While this is a concern for marketing and PR, HR should remember it has the responsibility of dealing with the pieces of terminating, disciplining, and investigating the marketer or executive who creates the firestorm on social media.  Therefore, all decision-makers in a company need to understand social media policy.

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LEGAL DISCLAIMER: The information provided here is meant to be general information, and should not be taken as specific legal advice that pertains to any particular situation.  The reader should not base any decisions on the information here to act or refrain from acting regarding a legal problem.  If you believe you have a legal problem please seek legal advice from a licensed attorney in the relevant jurisdiction.

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Sorry Draw the Law Delayed to Wednesday

Hey everyone, thank you for your continued support and reading Draw the Law. Unfortunately, I have been extremely busy and will not be able to get to today’s Draw the Law on Conditions in Contract law.  It will be up tomorrow, Wednesday, March 14, 2012.
In the meantime, please check out this other great websites for entrepreneurs, small business owners, social media marketers, and lawyers:

Pardon the delay, and check back Wednesday!

-RKH

Social Media and the Law Talk at The Greenhouse Innovation Hub


Hey everyone be sure to sign up for a seat at my talk next week on Social Media and the Law. If you missed How to Create a Social Media Policy with Social Media Club Hawaii last week or you made it and still have questions this is a good talk for you:

The details are as follows:

  • What: Social Media and the Law Talk
  • Description: a discussion of the laws that affect social media use, from defamation to trademark infringement, find out some of the legal landmines that may alter your perception of using social media.  This talk is particularly geared for small business owners, start-ups, and social media marketers.
  • Date: Wednesday, March 7th, 2012
  • Where: The Greenhouse Innovation Hub in Kaka’ako – 685 Auahi Street
  • Time: 6:00 – 7:00 p.m.
  • Price: $20.00, includes all materials

For more information and ticket purchase please click here.

See you then!

-RKH

Social Media and the Law Events


Hey everyone,

Lots to talk about and tell you about today on this great Presidents’ Day so let’s get to it:

Hawaii Innovation Alliance, Peter Kay, and ThinkTech Radio

This is a little late notice, but I will be joining Peter Kay (of Your Computer Minute fame) on ThinkTech Radio this afternoon from 4-5 p.m. We will be discussing the emergence of the Hawaii Innovation Alliance, an association of tech industry folks interested in becoming more involved with the legislative process with regard to tech laws.

ThinkTech is on from 4-5 p.m. (M-F) on station 760 KGU AM.

Social Media Club Hawaii: Creating a Social Media Policy Event

If you remember my prior posts on Social Media Policy and want to know more join me, and fellow panelists experts at Social Media Club Hawaii’s event tomorrow night discussing how to Create a Social Media Policy.  It is free and being hosted at the Amuse Wine Bar in the Honolulu Design Center. It starts at 6pm and runs to 730pm. For more information on the panelists and the event click here.

Social Media and the Law at The Greenhouse Innovation Hub

Finally, if you miss out on tomorrow night, I will be having a more in-depth discussion of the legal pitfalls that small business owners and startups should worry about when it comes to social media at The Greenhouse Innovation Hub on March 7th. There are pre-sale tickets for $20.00 and the purchase price includes materials and handouts for that evening. For more information click here.

Hope you can check one of these things out. See you IRL or in cyberspace!

-RKH

Social Media and the Law, as well as other Fun Legal Info

Well, it’s amazing isn’t it? The month of January of 2012 is almost done and so much has already happened. Here are some interesting social media and the law news that I found, as well as some other fun pieces to carry you over for the day until tomorrow’s Draw the Law.

Google and Privacy Concerns (this well continue to be an issue for 2012 for all Social Media)

Have you noticed that Goolge is making some major pushes lately?  Well come March 1 the search engine plans on doing a turnabout and begin combining information it collects about the user from various sites/services into a single profile. Definitely a privacy issue brewing, especially when the privacy officer has to issue statements. Click: Google to merge user data across its services – CNN.com You can also read the lengthy notification, which you keep bypassing when you log onto your Google+ page.

GPS = 4th Amendment “Search” as Determined by SCOTUS

For all of you interested in criminal law, like Marcus Landsberg criminal lawyer extraordinaire, notice that the Supreme Court- GPS Tracking Is Illegal Without Warrant. Basically, SCOTUS feels that the use of a GPS Tracking device is a “search” for the purposes of the 4th Amendment, thus cops must get a warrant.

Mutant Toys or Mutant Dolls? Yes, it Matters

This was a great listen if you love comic books and would like to theorize that certain superheroes are not human. Basically, the point of this podcast: Mutant Rights – Radiolab, was showing the importance of the word “doll” versus “toy” – you may not think it means much, but if you are an IP attorney and have an import business getting a cheaper rate for your action figures is a must and it all boils down to if a mutant is a human or not.

Department of Homeland Security Following Facebook Posts

Earlier this month DHS released a document stating it is monitoring social media and news sites. They cited federal law that they have to “provide situational awareness” to federal, state, local and tribal governments. You can read more about this here: DHS watching social media, news sites | Greeley Gazette.

NLRB Finds Certain Arbitration Clauses Violate Labor Laws

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has determined that mandatory arbitration agreements that prevent employees from joining together to pursue employment-related legal claims in any forum, whether in arbitration or in court violate federal labor laws. Check that announcement here: Board finds that certain mandatory arbitration agreements violate federal labor law.

Local Startup and Social Media Infromation

For you startup lovers, don’t forget tomorrow night will be Startup Hawaii kickoff. For more information, check it out here: Startup America Comes to Hawaii | Aloha StartUps. It will be at Bar 35 downtown. Definitely come on down if you started or are going to start a business!

Also check back at Alohastartups.com as I will be writing some future posts talking about Hawaii’s new legal non-profit aimed at helping entrepreneurs and startups, Business Law Corp. (businesslawcorps.org). I hope to get some interviews with the founders soon!

Finally, clear sometime in February as I will be getting down with Social Media and the Law as I will be trying to schedule a talk at The Greenhouse Innovation Hub and will be a panelists at Social Media Club Hawaii’s Creating a social media policy for business – what, how and when? event at Amuse Wine Bar on Feb. 21st. Hope to see you there!

Who Owns a Twitter Account? Are Bloggers Journalists? What about CAN-SPAM?


Well, it’s 2012, but social media is still around and as you are trying to figure out how Timeline works on Facebook these are some of the interesting social media and the law stories that have cropped up:

Item #1: Who Owns a Twitter account?

A former employee is being sued by his South-Carolina based company. For? Taking their twitter account. Noah Kravitz of Oakland, CA is being sued by PhoneDog, a mobile phone news site company for multiple claims pertaining to his act of switching a Twitter account used by him for the company. This account had amassed a following of 17,000 followers, and PhoneDog is seeking damages of $2.50 per follower over eight months for a total of $340,000.

Based on the couple of articles I read on this story the only thing clear is that the terms agreement surrounding the account were unclear. As more and more companies continue to see social media as a valuable tool and resource and are actually having workers use them the reality is that we will see more lawsuits arise. I think the valuable lesson here is to have a social media policy, a worker agreement for social media marketers, and transfer procedures in cases of ending events, like termination. Without agreements in place you will be left at the mercy of a court.

You can read more about the situation in this New York Times article.

Item #2: Bloggers are NOT Journalists.

BLOGGERS PAY ATTENTION! You may think you dig up the facts, do solid research, and ask serious questions, but you may have to face the fact that courts may not see your as a journalist. Why is that important? In many states there are media shield laws. For example, Oregon has such a law.

Blogger Crystal Cox sought to defend herself from investment firm Obsidian Finance Group against a $10 million lawsuit for defamation. The blogger lost the case even though she argued that she was an “investigative blogger.” The judge disagreed because she was not employed by some official media entity, and therefore she could not take advantage of Oregon’s media shield law. She lost and the judgment against her was for $2.5 million.

I am not sure if this had any effect, but just from casual observation and what I am told from litigators and trial attorneys is that pro se (representing yourself) litigants often lose, and often lose badly.  So that may have been a factor. However, what is clear is that just blogging and acting like a journalist is not enough. For more info read this article from Seattle Weekly.

Item #3: Optimal Social Media Marketing Plans Can Help you Comply with CAN-SPAM Act

I ran across this post, “How to Make Optimum Use of Social Media Platforms for Marketing Your Business” while flipping through my Zite app on my IPad. If you are a small business like me and are trying to get a handle on this thing called social media you know it isn’t always easy making a connection via Twitter, Facebook, or even your blog. So I really appreciated the tips it gave in this short post.

However, when the biggest things that help me to help you (via this article) is that last section, “Automation doesn’t turn out to be Helpful Always” – why? Well, I did a Law Lunch with The Greenhouse Innovation Hub back in December where I talked about complying with the CAN-SPAM Act.  It seems that good marketing mirrors what CAN-SPAM Act is trying to curb namely:

Whenever you are searching for consumers, you need to strike real conversations and do not spam their inbox with auto-generated mails.  This can even turn a potential customer away from you.  It is necessary that you engage in regular conversations with qualified leads.

So do yourself a favor and stop relying on spam and do real conversations and follow-ups. In addition, make sure you are complying with the other requirements of CAN-SPAM Act (because it does not apply just to bulk e-mails) when sending that personal touch e-mail.

Have a great first work week of 2012! Lookout for Draw the Law next week. If you can’t wait to see my doodles “Subscribe” today!

*Disclaimer:  This post discusses general legal issues, but does not constitute legal advice in any respect.  No reader should act or refrain from acting based on information contained herein without seeking the advice of counsel in the relevant jurisdiction.  Ryan K. Hew, Attorney At Law, LLLC expressly disclaims all liability in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this post.

Social Media and E-Discovery – What it Means for your Business’s Document Retention Policy

Business Owners: Document Management and Retention Policy

It is clear from the prior posts that lawyers are aware that there is a lot of evidence to be discovered from social media.  However, what does this mean the operations of a business?  In terms of the bottom line discovery will only complicate your day-to-day operations as you search for some blog post you put up two years ago.  Your social media should be added to the document management and retention policy, but it should be done efficiently as to minimize any future compliance or litigation action.

Consider this, that in 2010 FINRA issued guidance for blogs and social networking sites, and set forth the record keeping responsibilities in the financial broker-dealer business.

Every firm that intends to communicate, or permit its associated persons to communicate, through social media sites must first ensure that it can retain records of those communications as required by Rules 17a-3 ad 17a-4 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and NASD Rule 3110.

Why Have a Document Management and Retention Policy?

In general, you should always have a way of finding your files.  It will not only help comply with discovery requests, but for yourself it will help you find things for things such as regulator and tax requirements.  Not only will lawyers be grateful you can find your own files, but accountants and various consultants find it helpful as well.

Therefore, your business records policy should be aimed at three goals:

  1. Preserving until end of usefulness (both for legal and business reasons);
  2. A systematic approach to destruction, which explains why documents no longer exist;
  3. Limiting the number of areas that a discovery request will force you to search.

So basically, in your policy you have defined time, space, and existence.  It’s like having your own document universe where you get to control the rules.  In terms of legal considerations, and an attorney can help you with this part of the policy, but consider the following:

  1. litigation hold procedure if you anticipate any litigation or government investigation;
  2. how to handle the portability and backing up of data; and
  3. how to control non-company devices that access and use company data.

Incorporating Social Media

Now factoring in social media, you can kind of thing of it as it’s own galaxy in your document retention universe.  Due to its nature, and people’s perception of it you will have to a) think about how you want to archive it and b) train people to get used to organizing it.

As mentioned in the prior post you can download your Facebook data and get all your tweets in excel format.  For blog posts it depends on what service you are using, but some give you the option of backing up your blog.  You should also consider if you write in MS Word to draft the posts before hand of saving it in that format as well.

Finally, for your own sake and your lawyer’s sake be sure to digitally timestamp and signature the files.  This goes to authenticity of the evidence for a trial.  In addition, be sure to try and keep social media preserved in their native format.  Thus things like video or Flash files should be kept safe an the ability to replay is crucial because some regulatory situations will NOT accept screenshots.  Basically, you need to prove the exact contents and the manner it interacts with a user on any given date.

Training and Responding

Watch how people connected you talk about your products and services. Make sure employees and paid bloggers disclose anything you gave them in connection with touting your business's products and services.

Once you have set-up a document management and retention policy, concerning social media.  You have to train your employees to follow it.  It will give weight and credibility to why certain documents exist and others do not.  In terms of social media, when people use it they kind of think that what they post will not remain there and is only a flight of fancy.  So you are going to have to train against that mentality, as well as that social media posts are for company purposes and are a part of the company.  Followed by the fact that you will have to archive it like a library and you can see that training on social media retention is a little bit more complex.

If litigation does come knocking on your door, an attorney can help you strategize with a proper response.  Now that you have an efficient and searchable document management system it will be less of a nightmare.

Final Points: Centralize and Use Software

With social media and document retention centrality of the data/documents becomes a key issue.  Archiving and housing the data in all different manners and places is a real headache to sort later.  Put in the effort to centralize and organize in the beginning.  Lastly, while your business is small consider scalability of your document management system as it grows.   You may want to consider the use of specialized software.

As always if you like this post or any of my other series please Subscribe to this blawg to receive e-mail updates.  In addition, follow me on Twitter and “Like” me on Facebook.  If you need to contact me directly, please e-mail me at Ryankhew@hawaiiesquire.com or leave a message at 808-944-8400.

*Disclaimer:  This post discusses general legal issues, but does not constitute legal advice in any respect.  No reader should act or refrain from acting based on information contained herein without seeking the advice of counsel in the relevant jurisdiction.  Ryan K. Hew, Attorney At Law, LLLC expressly disclaims all liability in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this post.

Social Media as Evidence, Part III

Ethics and the Collecting of Social Media Evidence

Sorry, non-lawyers, today’s post is another legalese fest.  Tune in next week, and I should have some general thoughts for you on what social media as evidence means to you in the grand scheme of things of policies and procedures.

So from the previous post, it is clear that there is a lot possible uses for social media data to use against your opponent.   However, how do you get to it?  Before I discuss any collection of the data I would like to briefly mention legal ethics.

Ethics and Rules

You probably already know all about the Hawaii Rules of Professional Conduct, so I am not going to take up your precious blog reading time with going over them.  Just consider these rules when trying to investigate (pre-litigation and discovery phase) another party’s social media prescence.

Some HRPC Rules to Think about in the Realm of Social Media as Evidence:

  • Rule 8.4 (c ) – engage in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit or misrepresentation;
  • Rule 4.1(a) – make a false statement of material fact or law to a third person; or  (so no posing as a fake person to friend someone on Facebook)
  • Rule 5.3(b) – A lawyer having direct supervisory authority over the nonlawyer shall make reasonable efforts to ensure that the person’s conduct is compatible with the professional obligations of the lawyers; and
  • (c) A lawyer shall be responsible for conduct of such a person that would be a violation of the rules of professional conduct if engaged in by a lawyer if: (1) the lawyer orders or, with the knowledge of the specific conduct, ratifies the conduct involved[.] (therefore, no lawyer’s employee masking as another person to friend an opponent via Facebook).

The New York State Bar has a good opinion letter summarizing the situation.  You can read it here.  Just remember that Rules of Professional Conduct have variations from state-to-state.

Trying to Get to the Evidence

Once you figure out what you want it may be difficult to get at.  Subpoenaing the corporate entities that provide the social media sergice is unlikely to yield results.  There is already case law that states the private-message function of Facebook is no different than e-mail and that the sites do not have to produce the messages.  In addition, the Stored Communications Act may prohibit such action.

So this means you will have to go the discovery route and get the opponent to produce it through the process.  In terms of Facebook, it is really simple to do.  There is currently an option where the user can download all their data onto their hard drive.  If you go to “Account Settings” there is a small option link that says “Download a copy of your Facebook data.”  Just follow the instructions and you have your data.  The simplicity of it all negates any response that the act would be overly burdensome.  Twitter is not as convenient, but there is a way to get all your updates in a file and then presented in an Excel spreadsheet.  If you want know more about that visit this link.

Consider using a social media release document (like the way doctor’s use a medical release form).   You can then take that signed release and present it to the social media giants, but the response is dependent on the turnaround time of large corporate entities.  If that does not seemed to be a good option there is finally the time-consuming processes of screen capping, pdfing, printing, and/or videoing the data.

Finally, remember if your opponent’s social media information is discoverable that means so is your client’s stuff.  So take the time and counsel your client about the matters to avoid spoliation claims.

Anyway, that’s it for today, and in general for social media as evidence.  I will touch upon from the business owner’s/client’s perspective about what this means for their social media and electronic document retention policies and procedures.

As always if you like this post or any of my other series please Subscribe to this blawg to receive updates to your e-mail.  In addition, follow me on Twitter @Rkhewesq and Like Me on Facebook under Ryan K. Hew.  If you need to contact me directly, please e-mail me at Ryankhew@hawaiiesquire.com.

*Disclaimer:  This post discusses general legal issues, but does not constitute legal advice in any respect.   No reader should act or refrain from acting based on information contained herein without seeking the advice of counsel in the relevant jurisdiction.   Ryan K. Hew, Attorney At Law, LLLC expressly disclaims all liability in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this post.