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Can a business add additional fees and charges to a bill due to COVID-19?

Yes. Consider the additional costs to build barricades, close off every other table, provide enough disinfectant, and sanitizer. Also supplying disposable personal protective equipment (PPE) for employees. Obviously, that costs money.

Additionally, for those of you in the food industry you are already aware of the shortages in supplies. For example, COVID-19 has slowed the U.S. meat production for months due to closures: https://www.wsj.com/articles/coronavirus-to-slow-u-s-meat-production-for-months-ceo-says-11589540400.

What does a restaurant owner do in the face of rising costs, mandatory expenses, and limited customer base? Charge additional fees. Some businesses already have begun charging a COVID-19 fee to help cover these costs and expenses. Specifically, it appears as a line item on receipts. The economic justification is the COVID-19 fee is for the things like the PPE, plastic barricades, and other social distancing requirements placed by government regulation.

If the business is being transparent and disclosing the potential customer or client that additional fees will be charged, then the business can pass along those fees. Obviously, there are caveats to this, such as reasonableness and what is sufficient notice prior to the assessing such a charge. For example, kind of like how restaurants would notify you of automatic gratuity charge for parties over a certain size in their menu or putting a sign at the grocery store entrance to charge for providing a bag.

I understand for consumer-minded people that this is a shock, a deviation from the norm. Going from a couple of months of lockdown to added fees for some basic activities like dental cleaninings and haircuts is a bit much.  However, the overall sentiment is that, yes, a business can assess an additional fees due to COVID-19 social distancing expenses.

Isn’t this gouging?

Not likely. The law in Hawaii, which is Hawaii Revised Statute 127A-30 is specific about when it is prohibited to increase of prices during a state of emergency and similar situations. By the very nature that the economy is reopening, that would indicate the emergency is ending. Specifically, HRS 1270A-30 prohibits “any increase in selling price of any commodity, whether at the retail or wholesale level, in the area that is subject of the proclamation [state of emergency] or the severe weather warning;”

In the case of personal beauty service providers it would be hard to argue that their service is a “commodity.”

Additionally, the law makes clear that “any additional operating expenses incurred by the seller [] because of the emergency or disaster or the severe weather, and which can be documented may be passed on to the consumer.” Again, we have that key term “documented”.  So another out for these fees to documenting the decision in how to apply them. Business owners considering COVID-19 fees would be wise to do planning and accounting of how they are derived. Showing the correlation between the fees assessed and the social distancing requirement expenses may be critical in defending the practice.

Business owners should always be aware of actions that may be perceived by the public as unfair or deceptive. The reason is that consumer protection laws do consider unfair or deceptive acts or practices as unlawful. Therefore, a business owner needs to communicate effectively with potential clients and customers about their COVID-19 fees.

Is there an example of this in other industries?

The COVID-19 pandemic aside, disasters whether natural or man-made have always disrupted supply chains and causing problems for business owners. There are industries where detailing out the contractual relationship in these kinds of situation is the norm. One example is contractors and homeowners for the price of supplies.

Consider, if there is a forest fire that destroys a large supply of lumber. Then the lumber supplies for home building decreases, but demand goes up. So the contractor has to source the wood supplies from others. For business lawyers, we would look to see if this situation is in the contract. Is there an Escalation/Unit Price clause? This clause would be show there was an explicit understanding between the parties. It would indicate if the contractor is entitled to adjust the material price of an item due to an event impacting their bottom line. Like short supply of lumber due to a fire disaster.

Stores, restaurants, beauty services, and dental offices unused to such jumps in operating expenses obviously shock their consumers when they pass COVID-19 fees. Obviously, customers and clients also do not an expect a lengthy written contract that spells it out. Instead they just get the bill for it. The business owner then gets a lot of angry comments.

DISCLAIMER: This post provides general information, but does not constitute legal advice in any respect.  No reader should act or refrain from acting based on information contained in the post without seeking the advice of  an attorney in the relevant jurisdiction.  Hew & Bordenave, LLLP expressly disclaims all liability in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this post.

Where is the Hawaii economy for reopening? Where can an owner get guidance to reopen?

So here in Hawaii the economy is beginning to reopen. In Honolulu, hair, nail, lash, and in general beauty operators and services were allowed to re-open past Friday. In Maui, most businesses will be allowed to reopen on June 1st, whereas in Hawaii island personal services and restaurants (excluding bars and night clubs). On Kauai, salons and barber shops, retail and mails, and cleaning and construction have been reopened since May 22nd.

In general, what is clear is the Hawaii economy is heading toward reopening, with the likelihood of gyms, bars, night clubs, and large gathering places where intimate contact is involved of remaining closed until government officials can come up with plans and guidelines. This is something determined between the governor and the mayors, as the mayors submit their proposals to the governor for approval. Therefore, the industry re-openings are not uniform between the islands.

The best thing for a Hawaii business owner that needs guidance as they consider reopening is to review the State of Hawaii COVID-19 resources, and then depending what county you are in, review the county orders and guidelines. Further, for many industries their trade groups and associations, provide industry-specific guidelines on dealing with these regulations. Finally, of course professional advisors, such as attorneys and human resource companies are there dealing with the customer/client and employee aspects of reopening.

Is there a place where the local rules and regulations are at?

Yes, the State of Hawaii and the 4 counties have websites going over the various order, mayoral proclamations, and guidelines to assist businesses in their reopening and future plans to reopen the economy. Of course this information constantly changes due to the virus. Further, the government frequently issues clarifications on unclear rules or plans as people and businesses provide feedback.

What are some of the specific requirements a business owner needs to prepare for reopening?

For the business owner that is committed to reopening soon, and especially dealing with direct interactions with clients and customers if you’ve reviewed some of the state and counties’ guidelines, then you know there are a number of changes you will have to make. This is especially true for retail, restaurants and food courts, beauty and personal health services. The following are some of the social distancing requirements a business owner in these industries need be keenly aware about:

  • 6-feet distancing;
  •  Limited occupancy;
  •  Face coverings
  • Providing of hand sanitizer and sanitizing products
  • Regular disinfecting; and
  • of course signage to notify all employees and customers of these requirements.

Again, this is a partial and general list and so a business owner needs to spend some research and review time for their business plan to reopen. One Oahu has a Business Guidance Page: https://www.oneoahu.org/business-guidance

CDC Reopening Guidance for Cleaning and Disinfecting Public Spaces, Workplaces, Businesses Schools, and Homes: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/reopen-guidance.html

DISCLAIMER: This post provides general information, but does not constitute legal advice in any respect.  No reader should act or refrain from acting based on information contained in the post without seeking the advice of  an attorney in the relevant jurisdiction.  Hew & Bordenave, LLLP expressly disclaims all liability in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this post.

I’d like to share some of my views on Fred Korematsu Day of Civil Liberties and the Constitution. California created this special day, held every January 30, posthumously for Fred T. Korematsu. It is also celebrated in Hawaii and a number of other states. The Day commemorates Fred Korematsu’s birthday and his contributions as a Japanese American civil rights activist. It recognizes his contributions in fighting the injustice of Japanese interment during World War II, but in general recognizing civil liberties under the U.S. Constitution.

Manzanar War Relocation Center, California was the internment camp for Japanese Americans during World War 2.

Background and Context

In Korematsu v. United States, 323 U.S. 214 (1944), the Supreme Court sided with the U.S. government in upholding Executive Order 9066. An order that forced Japanese Americans into internment camps during World War II regardless of citizenship. The Korematsu case decision showed how deeply ingrained racism was and still is in our government and society. Racial profiling and the stripping of citizens of their civil liberties is not gone from the American experience. This conversation is still going on as we can see in today’s politics and news.

For example, author Lily Rothman poignantly observes in her Time’s article that knowing the history of Japanese internment matters a great deal. While the internment of Japanese Americans took place nearly 80 years ago, the themes of racial exclusion and stigma still linger today.

Therefore, I think I should share some of my views on this matter so you can understand the value’s of the firm and the kind of law that we practice.

This is a monument to Japanese interred at Manazar.

 

Words of Ryan K. Hew

I am sure people are wondering what impact does Fred Korematsu day have to do with a business attorney. Isn’t business law all about contracts or stymieing people’s rights in transactions?  I would probably respond that: (a) that nearly 90% of businesses in the U.S. are small businesses (20 workers or less); and (b) the government tramples the rights of the business owners as it did with the Japanese Americans during internment.  Japanese American business owners were forced out of business and into the camps. Nowadays, many immigrant business owners fear the law or lack access to legal assistance.

None of this is new, making Fred Korematsu Day an important symbol to remember and continue his legacy. I was a history major during my undergraduate days and even prior to the events of World War II and the unjust internment of Japanese Americans I learned about the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. This was one of the first major pieces of U.S. law to restrict immigration. Similar to today’s arguments on immigration, the Act was born out of fear of Chinese workers. Fears of them causing unemployment, depressing wages, and bringing other problems due to their ethnicity. The law acted to effectively ban Chinese immigration into the United States and prevent them from becoming U.S. citizens.  For me, this other dark piece of history is no different than the Japanese internment. It represents laws based on fear and bias.

Japanese Americas were forced to close their businesses and relocated to the internment camps.

My Personal History and Connection to What I Do

For me, reading about this history from as an undergraduate to a law student, did have personal relevance. My mother always told me stories of how my grandfather owned a popular shop in Chinatown Honolulu. However, unfortunately cancer took him at an early age. Soon after, my widowed grandmother was exploited due to her lack of English and inability to understand the law. Eventually she lost the business and much more due to the loss of income. To me the U.S. government forcing Japanese Americans from their homes and businesses was no different. Both scenarios arose out of the lack of justice and exploitation of the law. This is why I launched my own practice, why I enjoy educating small business owners with a variety of backgrounds on their business rights, and why I do pro bono with the Business Law Corps, whose motto is lawyers for economic justice, at the Patsy T. Mink Center for Business and Leadership.  The fight for civil liberties also means giving people fair chance at starting and owning their own business.

Final Words

I would like to extend my appreciation and thanks to Fred T. Korematsu and the Fred T. Korematsu Institute for continuing his legacy. At the firm I’m with, we fight for individual rights, economic justice, and civil liberties in our own way. Fred Korematsu Day highlights the need for us to remember and educate. Thank you for reading this post.

Handshake between business partners.

Talk about your business relationship, reduce it to a written agreement, sign it, then get to work with your partner.

When assisting business partners form their entities or when my litigation partner is consulting with me on a case I see the following scenario often:

A business partnership starts with a money person and an idea person. The idea person has a fantastic business plan and the money person has the cash. They think it is perfect. They rush to form a LLC or corporation, downloading an Operating Agreement or Bylaws from the Internet. It even might be worst, they do not even bother with a document. After that, they are running their business, but then several months into it they are fighting.

What do Business Partners Fight About?

Usually, they do not see eye-to-eye on major business decisions.  Decisions like:

  1. how much money should each person contribute;
  2. who has the authority to sign checks or what is the dollar limit each partner has for contract obligations;
  3. where should we locate our offices;
  4. when do we pay ourselves;
  5. what happens when one of us wants to leave; and
  6. so many other issues …

Business owners hate hearing this from their attorneys: slow down! They should be deliberative in their collaboration with their business partner. I sometimes remind people that getting a business partner is basically getting married. Also partnering with a friend is different than being a friend, you sometimes do not know their work ethic. This is why we urge business owners to get things in writing with their partners.

The goal when drafting Operating Agreements, Bylaws, and employment agreements* should be what are the processes that governs decision-making, what happens when there is disagreement, or if an owner wants to leave, etc. … Basically, preempt the fights by setting up contractual arrangements. *By the way, if an owner of a business wants to contribute work instead of capital, then the partners should consider an employment agreement. It is solely not just for contract law purposes, but for tax and accounting issues.

Business partners think that their idea will be a money-maker and that their partner is going to make it happen.  They fail to calculate that even in success that their business partner may have other ideas on the direction of the business.  There is nothing wrong with differences of opinion, but when decision-making is paralyzed it could stop the business from moving forward. Further, for its employees, vendors, and service-providers, knowledge of an ongoing dispute amongst the business owners can make them question the survivability of the business.

Protect your Business Relationship by Communicating

It is easy. Talk about it, come to an agreement, and then get it in writing before the business starts. Many people just want us attorneys to give them their documents or download their own forms for the Internet. They think it saves them time and money.  I’d contend that is the wrong way to look at it. The time and money spent on your governing documents is an investment in the relationship. They are a contractual foundation.

If not, you are just pushing disputes to a later date. Consider that when the money has been spent, you’ve worked countless days and nights, and now you are arguing.  Then you realize all you have for your contract rights is a poorly drafted document … or worst yet, you don’t have one at all.  So do yourself a favor, have the conversation now and plan for the future.  Communicating when you are on good terms with a partner is easier, then when you are fighting.

DISCLAIMER: This post discusses general legal issues, but does not constitute legal advice in any respect.  No reader should act or refrain from acting based on information contained in the post without seeking the advice of  an attorney in the relevant jurisdiction.  Hew & Bordenave, LLLP expressly disclaims all liability in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this post.

 

*Disclaimer:  This post discusses general legal issues, but does not constitute legal advice in any respect.  No reader should act or refrain from acting based on information contained herein without seeking the advice of counsel in the relevant jurisdiction.  Ryan K. Hew, Attorney At Law, LLLC expressly disclaims all liability in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this post.

Today’s Post is Not About Sledgehammer Time: It’s Only Focused on the Shopping Cart Law

Hey all, I decided to jump on the bandwagon (may be the shopping cart?) and talk about shopping carts.  However, I am not going to get into whether Rep. Brower’s actions exposes him to civil or criminal liabilities or if they were right or wrong.  I think Civil Beat, attorney Marcus Landsberg, and the news outlet and social media has already beaten that cart into disrepair (yeah, I am going to keep trying to hammer away with the lame jokes and puns).

Anyway, what I would like to do is take a look at this matter from a business establishment perspective (those that put out the carts) and what the legislature has put forth as a law on point (looking at what is on the books.  It turns out that we have enacted a law specifically for shopping carts.  HRS § 633-16 discusses the unauthorized removal of shopping carts.  Further, as it is in Chapter 633, it puts this matter in small claims court.  

Breaking Down the Law

So looking at the law, as currently stated, it makes it a violation for a person to remove a shopping cart (including baskets and other devices) from the premises of business establishment (that owns the cart), if they are unauthorized.  The premises include the parking lot as well as the sidewalks adjacent to the business establishment’s premises.

The business establishment is the person who has the ability to bring a claim under this law if there is damage to the business or property.  The business may sue for damages and win an award equal to the replacement value of the cart (and keep in mind the average cost of a cart ranges from $100 – 250), basket, or device plus the cost of the suit.  The establishment can also sue to enjoin the unauthorized act.

So in order for a business to win in small claims court (under this law) the must nail down these elements: 

  1. they are the lawful owner of the cart, which has been identified;
  2. they gave notice, which means posting a conspicuous sign where the carts are stored that says the carts are not to be removed;
  3. that the cart was removed from the business location without proper authority; and
  4. the person accused of violating this law is in possession or had control of the cart.

Practicalities of the Law

In terms of policymaking it is understandable why the legislature gave such a legal action for business owners of these carts (as they are expensive).  However, in terms of reality is if these carts are being taken by people who are unable to pay the damages or the business cannot track them down its effectiveness as a law should be looked into.  In addition, how many shopping cart owners utilize this law for these purposes? All I know at this point though is that the bang of the gavel in your favor is a better sound than a squeaky cart on uneven pavement!

A Final Word

Although this post was focused on shopping carts, business owners for any type of legal action should always consider the cost of pursuing claims in court versus that of implementing practical solutions (where possible), or possibly a combination of legal and practical action, such as drafting contracts, policies, procedures, and other preventative measures.  Anyway, that’s it for this post.  Mahalo!

Business Entity Formation Talk at ING Direct Cafe in Waikiki

August 1st – I will be holding my Business Entity Formation Talk from 6:00 – 7:00 pm. Come learn the differences between the entities at ING Direct Cafe.

By the way, you may have noticed, contract law there are a lot of terms that describe the parties involved that end with “or” or “ee”. For example, offeror and offeree from this week’s Draw the Law.  If you see this in a long legal document you can immediately recognize the relationship of the parties involved.
The ”or” person is the originating person of the action.  It starts with them, and then ends with the “ee” person.  Like’s take the example of offerror and offeree.  The offeror is the one making the offer, whereas the offeree is receiving the offer.

This works for other relationships like in an assignment, where there is the assignor, the one assigning property or interest rights in something, and the assignee, the one receiving the property or interest rights.  Some relationships, do not necessarily follow this categorization, as you will see below (i.e. trustor and trustee).

Consider the following pairs:

  • Offeror/offeree – offeror makes an offer to the offeree
  • Payor/payee – the payor makes payment to the payee (i.e. the payee is the one who endorses a received check)
  • Lessor/lessee – the lessor leases property (or the right to use property) to the lessee
  • Licensor/licensee – the licensor grants a license of the right to use something (IP) to the licensee
  • Assignor/assignee – the assignor transfers rights or property to the assignee (via an assignment)
  • Grantor/grantee – the grantor grants title in real property to the grantee
  • donor/donee – the donor donates (gifts something) to the donee)
  • *Settlor (trustor)/trustee – the settlor creates the trust, which the trustee holds and manages for the benefit of the trust’s beneficiaries

Well, it’s amazing isn’t it? The month of January of 2012 is almost done and so much has already happened. Here are some interesting social media and the law news that I found, as well as some other fun pieces to carry you over for the day until tomorrow’s Draw the Law.

Google and Privacy Concerns (this well continue to be an issue for 2012 for all Social Media)

Have you noticed that Goolge is making some major pushes lately?  Well come March 1 the search engine plans on doing a turnabout and begin combining information it collects about the user from various sites/services into a single profile. Definitely a privacy issue brewing, especially when the privacy officer has to issue statements. Click: Google to merge user data across its services – CNN.com You can also read the lengthy notification, which you keep bypassing when you log onto your Google+ page.

GPS = 4th Amendment “Search” as Determined by SCOTUS

For all of you interested in criminal law, like Marcus Landsberg criminal lawyer extraordinaire, notice that the Supreme Court- GPS Tracking Is Illegal Without Warrant. Basically, SCOTUS feels that the use of a GPS Tracking device is a “search” for the purposes of the 4th Amendment, thus cops must get a warrant.

Mutant Toys or Mutant Dolls? Yes, it Matters

This was a great listen if you love comic books and would like to theorize that certain superheroes are not human. Basically, the point of this podcast: Mutant Rights – Radiolab, was showing the importance of the word “doll” versus “toy” – you may not think it means much, but if you are an IP attorney and have an import business getting a cheaper rate for your action figures is a must and it all boils down to if a mutant is a human or not.

Department of Homeland Security Following Facebook Posts

Earlier this month DHS released a document stating it is monitoring social media and news sites. They cited federal law that they have to “provide situational awareness” to federal, state, local and tribal governments. You can read more about this here: DHS watching social media, news sites | Greeley Gazette.

NLRB Finds Certain Arbitration Clauses Violate Labor Laws

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has determined that mandatory arbitration agreements that prevent employees from joining together to pursue employment-related legal claims in any forum, whether in arbitration or in court violate federal labor laws. Check that announcement here: Board finds that certain mandatory arbitration agreements violate federal labor law.

Local Startup and Social Media Infromation

For you startup lovers, don’t forget tomorrow night will be Startup Hawaii kickoff. For more information, check it out here: Startup America Comes to Hawaii | Aloha StartUps. It will be at Bar 35 downtown. Definitely come on down if you started or are going to start a business!

Also check back at Alohastartups.com as I will be writing some future posts talking about Hawaii’s new legal non-profit aimed at helping entrepreneurs and startups, Business Law Corp. (businesslawcorps.org). I hope to get some interviews with the founders soon!

Finally, clear sometime in February as I will be getting down with Social Media and the Law as I will be trying to schedule a talk at The Greenhouse Innovation Hub and will be a panelists at Social Media Club Hawaii’s Creating a social media policy for business – what, how and when? event at Amuse Wine Bar on Feb. 21st. Hope to see you there!


Aloha Everyone!

Hope you are having an awesome Friday for this last aloha Friday of 2011. I just wanted to take the time, as I close out for the day to wish you all a happy and safe New Year’s Eve and for a start of a good New Year. In addition, I would like to thank all my friends, acquaintances, clients, readers, supporters, and yes even my Twitter followers for making 2011 a good start for me.

Storytelling in 2011 

I appreciate getting to know you all in the various settings that I have and welcome meeting new people and reconnecting with old friends whether it be in social media, IRL networking, or for coffee. Also thank you for allowing me to tell you all my story and journey of an attorney that loves the intersection of law, business, and politics in the realm of small business and startups.

Past Highlights 

I would like to highlight thanks to all of you for the positive feedback regarding this site and my services. In particular, I would like to continue to make this site a place a resource for small businesses and startups navigating transactional and compliance issues. Thus from this 2011 you will continue to see posts series like the following:

Because I care about the Hawaii community and am finding that I meet new people of this great state via social media I will continue to do special write-ups on:

New Features for 2012 

Although like all good growing businesses, their ideas change and grow I will be rolling out new features and ways to get information into struggling business owners’ hands. In fact, I’ll admit that being an attorney who just started going solo there were times I wish there were resources for me, and there were, but I will continue to try to deliver information to the people who want its and need it. I would like to thank various people and organizations that have given me feedback before I talk about my 2012 features.

First the Thank Yous

Thank you to my friends at Off-Menu Catering, all of you give so much support and thoughtful feed back to carry me through continuing to serve small business.

Thank you to The Greenhouse: Innovation Hub and in particular Doc Rock (@docrock) and John Garcia (@johngarcia) for creativity and inspiration, Jill (@swamwine) of SWAM, Danny (@wangchungs) of Wang Chung’s, and Shawn of Small Business Planning Hawaii (@SBPHawaii) for bouncing ideas off of to deliver services and information to small business owners. Melissa Chang (@Melissa808), Jennifer Lieu (@jlieu), and Capsun Poe (@capsun) always guiding lights for social media use.

Mahalo to the Young Lawyers Division, HSBA, and Leadership Institute for providing guidance to an attorney.  To fellow attorneys Wayne J. Chi and Scott C. Suzuki thank you for doing talks with me, some more planned in the future! To William (@alohastartups) of Alohastartups.com, much thanks as you are providing a great resource for startups in Hawaii and I am excited for the plan in 2012. However, I think I still owe you a post from 2011! Thanks to Rechung (@TheBoxJelly) of The Box Jelly for providing a space for legal talks and helping Hawaii coworkers.

Finally, thank you to Marcus Landsberg, a fellow Hawaii attorney that has helped out and set down this path of being a solo practitioner like me and showing that solo does not mean alone.

. . . Back to New Features of 2012

Ok, enough with the thank yous and let me get to the new features that you readers can look forward to from me in 2012 for this site in particular:

  • PODCASTS – that’s right Hawaii small business owners, no worries if you cannot make it down to one of my talks! I will be providing portions of them for you to watch in your store or at home.
  • One-sheets – simple pdfs talking about one particular issue for you to download, print, and share.
  • Newsletter – I am not sure what the frequency will be, but definitely watch your e-mail inboxes!
  • REVAMP of blog and website – I will be shifting gears and making sure that I deliver to you content in a more user-friendly style!

That’s it for this year! Have fun and be safe this New Year’s Eve and see you in 2012 (Year of the Dragon!).

-RKH

I was fortunate enough to be able to attend Hawaii Business Magazine’s SmallBiz Lunch and Learn: Leveraging Technology and Social Media to Grow Your Business.

It was a great event and I was able to learn some great advice and thought of some good ideas.  The experts that had on had were as follows: 1) Roxanne Darling of Bare Feet Studios and the Founder of Social Media Club; 2) Cyrus Driver, VP of Oceanic Time Warner Cable Business Class; and 3) Bernard Uy Co-Founder of Wall-to-Wall Studios.

This is NOT a Social Media and the Law post.  It is a post on some of the nuggets of practical wisdom that I gathered from the lunch and would like to share.  I also feel this gives you some of that business perspective I was mention in my posts as a JD who has his MBA.

They are the following, in no particular order of priority:

  • Thanks to social media EVERY business is a technology business, you will use it some aspect;
  • always thanks to social media your customers OWN your brand – they have become self-publishers;
  • because of the prior two points, LISTEN to your customers;
  • in fact, use them as informal discussion and research group on new marketing plans;
  • ask your customers who they think your competitors are for defining your brand;
  • if you get a negative review on Yelp or the like, it’s good thing – gives you an opportunity to show how you respond and change;
  • use video, there are some great apps on smartphones that you can upload to your Youtube account;
  • be more personal, less cookie-cutter in your usage of social media;
  • if you cannot compete on price, location, and the like – compete on YOU, make sure your customer/clients like working with you;
  • always update and double–check your links, dead links help no one.

As a solopreneur I don’t know if I will get to make use of all these ideas, but I definitely think that any business, great or small should definitely think about these things and it offers a great starting point.

See you on Monday or Tuesday next week when I continue discussing evidentiary matters in the context of Social Media.

Have an awesome weekend!

-RKH