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In last week’s bLAWg post, I discussed the remote working trend and how some industries are adopting it permanently. Remote work is changing the way businesses operate. Obviously, one critical area is employer-employee interaction. Today’s post provides a listicle of some of the compliance and legal issues to consider when preparing a permanent work from home plan for your employees.

The Listicle

Consider the following items and questions if you are considering remote working for your business:

Foreign Business Registration

  • If employees are working from another state, you may have to register your business as a “foreign” entity.
  • Registration requirements are different for each state. If you have to register, then it is a likely bet you will have to consider taxes, and labor and employment laws of the new state.
  • Some states and counties also restrict the type of businesses that can operate in residential areas, so if your employee is going to set-up shop at home, you may have to get a permit depending on what they are doing.

Taxes

  • If an employee is working outside of the employer’s state of operation the employer may have to pay the taxes of that state, for instance payroll and withholding.
  • Employees should review the way they receive benefits from their employer and where they must file income taxes with a tax adviser/preparer.

Labor and Employment

  • Workers’ compensation and general liability insurance
  • TDI
  • Discrimination
  • Disabilities accommodation
  • Occupational health and safety
  • Privacy and HR records access
  • Meal and rest breaks
  • Overtime/wage/compensation
  • Expense reimbursements
  • Benefits
  • Restrictive covenants

Privacy & Security

  • Review the current IT set up and policies to implement for remote working.
  • Are you having employee’s set-up a home office? Are they using their personal devices or a company-issued one?
  • How are they accessing/sharing files?
  • How would your customers/clients feel if they know your workers are accessing sensitive information in a remote location?
  • How are you monitoring communications? Are you having Zoom calls with your workers while family members are in the room?

Employment Agreements and Policies

  • Employment agreements are covered by labor and employment laws; however, employers are legally allowed to contract away liabilities or make other arrangements.
  • What happens to the written relationship when the worker moves to a more protective or less protective state?
  • You may have signed in California, but can you enforce in Hawaii court? What provisions are you enforcing?
  • Workplace policies created to be compliant for one state may not apply to remote workers scattered across the globe.
  • Review, discuss, and revise/amend where necessary.

As Always Do Your Homework and Consult with Others

The above listicle is not meant to be exhaustive. As with everything with the law it will be a case-by-case basis. This is especially so with a highly valued or professional employee negotiating for this change.  It is best that you conduct your research and plan accordingly. You will need to understand all the laws in your home state and the state that the employee will be remotely working in. Especially, when it comes to HR and employment, the labor laws can differ vastly from state-to-state in their worker protections, insurance requirements, etc. Last week’s bLAWg post listed some advisers you should consult with when making this decision.

Thoughts and Questions

Is your business currently thinking of transitioning to permanent remote work? Do you think it is worth it for all the planning needed? Do you have questions about compliance/legal issues? If so, then contact us at admin@hewbordenave.com. Check back next week and I’ll discuss some of the questions I’ve gotten about remote working.

DISCLAIMER: This post provides general information, but does not constitute legal advice in any respect.  No reader should act or refrain from acting based on information contained in the post without seeking the advice of  an attorney in the relevant jurisdiction.  Hew & Bordenave, LLLP expressly disclaims all liability in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this post.

Generally, when larger companies change their workflow arrangement to comply with new regulations, small and medium-sized businesses tend to follow suit. Remember your email inbox when the largest retailers and social media giants updated their web/app privacy policies in the face of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)? Smaller companies then tended to follow suit by updating their own privacy policies because they were following what bigger companies were doing. Will the same happen for remote working?

Trending Toward Remote Working

COVID-19 has accelerated the work-from-home/remote working trend. First, several of the tech giants (as well as other larger companies) have turned the temporary policy in to a permanent one. Also, newer companies that rely on professional, administrative, and tech workers were already leaning into utilizing less office space to reduce overhead costs.

Many industries have grown and thrived during the stay-at-home orders. Others have re-invented their business due to people spending most or all their time at home. For example, why offer a gym membership, or an on-site gym when customers are buying at home workout equipment?

Our firm allowed for remote working prior to COVID-19 and may continue to allow it into the foreseeable future. Employees in general may in fact enjoy the flexibility working from home allows. I’ve noticed that stay-at-home workers are now launching their Twitch stream, lifestyle YouTube channel, or other streaming platforms. Will workers even want to go back to traditional office settings once things return to “normal?” Answers depend, and may be divided.

Some Food for Thought for Hawaii and Remote Working

The trend causing remote working presents interesting opportunities for Hawaii. As certain industries close and people move away, this will create space for others to move in. It is true that the cost-of-living here is high for current residents. However, for those moving away from even more expensive zip codes or for higher income individuals wanting to return home, Hawaii might now be an option. I find tech workers, lawyers, accountants, and for others who can comfortably do their job almost entirely remotely, that the “cost of paradise tax” is manageable. I discussed potential legal issues with a telehealth specialist who would be directing calls to another state, but operating their practice from their home office here in the islands.

Even prior to COVID-19, the state government was keen on emphasizing other sectors beyond tourism. The question is whether law and policymakers at the state and county governments decide to lure companies and workers by either restructuring compliance issues, or creating new incentives. This is nothing new, as many have presented ways for Hawaii to diversify the economy by offering incentives, such as Act 88, and content production.

Ask for Advice

Businesses must adapt. As a transactional attorney, I have assisted business owners with strategic relationships. I have received inquiries about legal issues allowing employees to work remotely. Usually, in the context of having to alter operations in the face of COVID-19 restrictions. While, remote working is an option, if you are changing the relationship, you should do some research and planning prior to implementing. Permanent work from home can reduce the costs, such as commercial space rent, but presents new challenges. One of the biggest is an employee moving out of state to work, whether temporarily or permanently.

Always consider consulting your usual advisors:

  • Attorney – possibly several due to jurisdiction and subject matter issues
  • Accountant – taxes
  • HR Consultant – best practices for communication, etc.
  • IT – review software, hardware, and internet access needed for remote work

Also, consider speaking to others for insight. Possibly, a mentor or another business owner that took the plunge. Check back next week for my listicle of some compliance issues to consider for remote working implementation.

In the meantime, what do you think? How do you think remote working will impact Hawaii? How are you adapting to deal with changes in the economy and your workers? Contact us at admin@hewbordenave.com to let us know your thoughts.

Once again, we have a stay-at-home order for O‘ahu, from now through September 23, 2020. There are some new exceptions carved out in this order, which should involve a personal risk/reward analysis.  For example, you are now allowed to go hiking, but only “solo.” This means you may not hike in any size group, even if you practice physical distancing and wear PPE. Certainly, we all want to get out of the house, however, common sense should compel you to think hard about going on an intermediate or advanced hike, with no partner, even if it is technically permitted under the new rules. Bringing your phone may not be enough either, because not all carriers have service in every valley or corner of the island.  As such, if you want to go for a hike, perhaps tone it down and play it safe for the time being.

Check out these five safety tips from Oahu Search & Research (OSAR):

  1. Do Your Research
    • Review this website for trails
    • Note, that in Hawai‘i only marked State trails are considered legal for hiking
  2. Check the Weather
    • Check the forecast in advance and day of
  3. Pack Your Bag
    • Map & Compass
    • Sun Protection – sunscreen, hats, long sleeved shirts, and pants
    • Extra Layers
    • Flashlight
    • First Aid Kit
    • Fire Starter
    • Repair Kit
    • Extra Food & Water
    • Emergency Shelter
    • Signaling Device – whistle, mirror
  4. Share Your Plan
    • Be sure a friend always knows where you are going, and when you will be back, especially if you are hiking alone (which is something OSAR strongly discourages)
  5. If Lost: S.T.O.P
    • S: Stop/Sit – take a break
    • T: Think – analyze the situation
    • O: Observe – note surroundings and resources
    • P: Plan – create a plan based on your observations

Be smart, be prepared, and stay safe!

Every year, dozens of pedestrians are killed in Hawaii while crossing the street, walking along roadways, or traversing our sidewalks. According to the State of Hawaii Preliminary Traffic Fatalities Report, from January 1 through July 30, 2020 there were eight pedestrian fatalities.  This number is considered lower than some years, but is likely impacted by the 2020 Coronavirus pandemic. To address this growing epidemic of pedestrian accidents and fatalities, Hawaii designated August as Pedestrian Safety Month.

The Walk Wise Hawaii pedestrian committee works alongside the Department of Transportation Services (DTS) to educate the public on good pedestrian practices and driver awareness of pedestrian movement. Here are the Walk Wise Hawaii pedestrian safety tips:

Pedestrian Safety Tips

  1. Always cross the street at a crosswalk. When no crosswalk is available, please cross at a corner.
  2. Be vigilant. Always look left-right-left and continue to look while crossing the street.
  3. Do not enter the crosswalk if the light indicator is counting down. The countdown is for pedestrians already in the crosswalk.
  4. Always walk when crossing the street. Never run.
  5. Always wear bright or refl­ective clothing when walking between dusk and dawn.
  6. Always watch for vehicles backing out of driveways or parking stalls. Drivers do not always see you.
  7. If there is no sidewalk, always walk on the side of the roadway facing on-coming traffic.

Also, be mindful of sidewalk/crosswalk rules and regulations, such as:

Sidewalk/Crosswalk Rules & Regulations

  • The fine for pedestrians who jaywalk is $130.
  • The fine for pedestrians who begin crossing when the countdown signal begins to flash is $130. However, if you are already in the crosswalk when the countdown signal begins to flash, you are not violating the law and should finish crossing the street.

Whether you’re a pedestrian or a driver, please be safe, be aware, and let’s work together to make our streets, crosswalks, and sidewalks safer for our communities.

For more information about pedestrian safety, please visit this website.

DISCLAIMERThis post provides general information, but does not constitute legal advice in any respect.  No reader should act or refrain from acting based on information contained in the post without seeking the advice of an attorney in the relevant jurisdiction.  Hew & Bordenave, LLLP expressly disclaims all liability in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this post.

 

Hawaii COVID-19 Spikes

Today, Hawaii reported 18 new cases of Covid-19, which is part of a two week trend of rising confirmed cases.  The rise in confirmed cases is being attributed to the “reopening” of the economy and daily activities.   Part and parcel to that is another concerning trend.  As we are emerging from our respective lockdowns, there are daily news reports stating some people are ignoring warnings. They are refusing to wear face masks correctly or at all. Sometimes refusing to follow any social distancing guidelines.  These selfish actions threaten to undo months of hard work and diligence.

Remember, entering private businesses is a privilege, not a right. 

If a business or landowner sets reasonable requests for entry, such as wearing appropriate clothing or wearing a mask during an ongoing pandemic, then those are considered conditions to entry.  They are legal, and absent a legitimate medical condition, your personal opinions and feelings about masks, social distancing, etc. are irrelevant. If you choose to disregard these rules, then there are consequences. It  jeopardizes your safety and those around you. So you can be removed from the premises and may be subject to arrest for trespassing for refusing to leave.  Mayor Caldwell has even suggested calling 911 if a customer refuses wearing a mask.

Remember, we are all in this together. So if we work as a community, then we will come out of it stronger and better off.

California: Masks Mandatory

On the same topic, although in California, there were over 4,000 new confirmed cases today, June 18, 2020.  As the daily count has continued to grow recently, Governor Newsom has ordered that face masks must now be worn at all times when you are out in the public.  Stay safe, be smart, wear a mask.   No big deal.

DISCLAIMER: This post provides general information, but does not constitute legal advice in any respect.  No reader should act or refrain from acting based on information contained in the post without seeking the advice of  an attorney in the relevant jurisdiction.  Hew & Bordenave, LLLP expressly disclaims all liability in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this post.

Can a business add additional fees and charges to a bill due to COVID-19?

Yes. Consider the additional costs to build barricades, close off every other table, provide enough disinfectant, and sanitizer. Also supplying disposable personal protective equipment (PPE) for employees. Obviously, that costs money.

Additionally, for those of you in the food industry you are already aware of the shortages in supplies. For example, COVID-19 has slowed the U.S. meat production for months due to closures: https://www.wsj.com/articles/coronavirus-to-slow-u-s-meat-production-for-months-ceo-says-11589540400.

What does a restaurant owner do in the face of rising costs, mandatory expenses, and limited customer base? Charge additional fees. Some businesses already have begun charging a COVID-19 fee to help cover these costs and expenses. Specifically, it appears as a line item on receipts. The economic justification is the COVID-19 fee is for the things like the PPE, plastic barricades, and other social distancing requirements placed by government regulation.

If the business is being transparent and disclosing the potential customer or client that additional fees will be charged, then the business can pass along those fees. Obviously, there are caveats to this, such as reasonableness and what is sufficient notice prior to the assessing such a charge. For example, kind of like how restaurants would notify you of automatic gratuity charge for parties over a certain size in their menu or putting a sign at the grocery store entrance to charge for providing a bag.

I understand for consumer-minded people that this is a shock, a deviation from the norm. Going from a couple of months of lockdown to added fees for some basic activities like dental cleaninings and haircuts is a bit much.  However, the overall sentiment is that, yes, a business can assess an additional fees due to COVID-19 social distancing expenses.

Isn’t this gouging?

Not likely. The law in Hawaii, which is Hawaii Revised Statute 127A-30 is specific about when it is prohibited to increase of prices during a state of emergency and similar situations. By the very nature that the economy is reopening, that would indicate the emergency is ending. Specifically, HRS 1270A-30 prohibits “any increase in selling price of any commodity, whether at the retail or wholesale level, in the area that is subject of the proclamation [state of emergency] or the severe weather warning;”

In the case of personal beauty service providers it would be hard to argue that their service is a “commodity.”

Additionally, the law makes clear that “any additional operating expenses incurred by the seller [] because of the emergency or disaster or the severe weather, and which can be documented may be passed on to the consumer.” Again, we have that key term “documented”.  So another out for these fees to documenting the decision in how to apply them. Business owners considering COVID-19 fees would be wise to do planning and accounting of how they are derived. Showing the correlation between the fees assessed and the social distancing requirement expenses may be critical in defending the practice.

Business owners should always be aware of actions that may be perceived by the public as unfair or deceptive. The reason is that consumer protection laws do consider unfair or deceptive acts or practices as unlawful. Therefore, a business owner needs to communicate effectively with potential clients and customers about their COVID-19 fees.

Is there an example of this in other industries?

The COVID-19 pandemic aside, disasters whether natural or man-made have always disrupted supply chains and causing problems for business owners. There are industries where detailing out the contractual relationship in these kinds of situation is the norm. One example is contractors and homeowners for the price of supplies.

Consider, if there is a forest fire that destroys a large supply of lumber. Then the lumber supplies for home building decreases, but demand goes up. So the contractor has to source the wood supplies from others. For business lawyers, we would look to see if this situation is in the contract. Is there an Escalation/Unit Price clause? This clause would be show there was an explicit understanding between the parties. It would indicate if the contractor is entitled to adjust the material price of an item due to an event impacting their bottom line. Like short supply of lumber due to a fire disaster.

Stores, restaurants, beauty services, and dental offices unused to such jumps in operating expenses obviously shock their consumers when they pass COVID-19 fees. Obviously, customers and clients also do not an expect a lengthy written contract that spells it out. Instead they just get the bill for it. The business owner then gets a lot of angry comments.

DISCLAIMER: This post provides general information, but does not constitute legal advice in any respect.  No reader should act or refrain from acting based on information contained in the post without seeking the advice of  an attorney in the relevant jurisdiction.  Hew & Bordenave, LLLP expressly disclaims all liability in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this post.

Where is the Hawaii economy for reopening? Where can an owner get guidance to reopen?

So here in Hawaii the economy is beginning to reopen. In Honolulu, hair, nail, lash, and in general beauty operators and services were allowed to re-open past Friday. In Maui, most businesses will be allowed to reopen on June 1st, whereas in Hawaii island personal services and restaurants (excluding bars and night clubs). On Kauai, salons and barber shops, retail and mails, and cleaning and construction have been reopened since May 22nd.

In general, what is clear is the Hawaii economy is heading toward reopening, with the likelihood of gyms, bars, night clubs, and large gathering places where intimate contact is involved of remaining closed until government officials can come up with plans and guidelines. This is something determined between the governor and the mayors, as the mayors submit their proposals to the governor for approval. Therefore, the industry re-openings are not uniform between the islands.

The best thing for a Hawaii business owner that needs guidance as they consider reopening is to review the State of Hawaii COVID-19 resources, and then depending what county you are in, review the county orders and guidelines. Further, for many industries their trade groups and associations, provide industry-specific guidelines on dealing with these regulations. Finally, of course professional advisors, such as attorneys and human resource companies are there dealing with the customer/client and employee aspects of reopening.

Is there a place where the local rules and regulations are at?

Yes, the State of Hawaii and the 4 counties have websites going over the various order, mayoral proclamations, and guidelines to assist businesses in their reopening and future plans to reopen the economy. Of course this information constantly changes due to the virus. Further, the government frequently issues clarifications on unclear rules or plans as people and businesses provide feedback.

What are some of the specific requirements a business owner needs to prepare for reopening?

For the business owner that is committed to reopening soon, and especially dealing with direct interactions with clients and customers if you’ve reviewed some of the state and counties’ guidelines, then you know there are a number of changes you will have to make. This is especially true for retail, restaurants and food courts, beauty and personal health services. The following are some of the social distancing requirements a business owner in these industries need be keenly aware about:

  • 6-feet distancing;
  •  Limited occupancy;
  •  Face coverings
  • Providing of hand sanitizer and sanitizing products
  • Regular disinfecting; and
  • of course signage to notify all employees and customers of these requirements.

Again, this is a partial and general list and so a business owner needs to spend some research and review time for their business plan to reopen. One Oahu has a Business Guidance Page: https://www.oneoahu.org/business-guidance

CDC Reopening Guidance for Cleaning and Disinfecting Public Spaces, Workplaces, Businesses Schools, and Homes: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/reopen-guidance.html

DISCLAIMER: This post provides general information, but does not constitute legal advice in any respect.  No reader should act or refrain from acting based on information contained in the post without seeking the advice of  an attorney in the relevant jurisdiction.  Hew & Bordenave, LLLP expressly disclaims all liability in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this post.

Happy Lunar New Year!

As some of you know I do a post every year related to the Chinese zodiac animal of the New Year. Last year it was about landlord’s charging extra rent for dogs. The year prior to that one was, can you keep chickens in your backyard. Going to back when I started this tradition, in 2016, I wrote about can you own a monkey in Hawaii. Thank goodness dragon is still five years away! I have no idea what I am going to do that year …

2019 is Year of the Boar, so we are going hunting. Well, not literally, but I am going to cover the general basics for legally hunting feral pigs (sus scrofa scrofa) in the State of Hawaii.

Sus scrofa scrofa.

What do I Need to Hunt Legally?

Before getting to the paperwork, in general you should understand that hunting animals in Hawaii is largely regulated by the Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR).  DLNR is responsible for the management of public lands and all the interests therein, including the animals. So if you are planning to hunt and have further questions, DLNR is likely who you will be contacting.

With regard to the paperwork, a hunting in Hawaii requires a hunting license. A hunting license is necessary whether you are going to be hunting on public or private lands. In order to purchase a hunting license though you must either possess:

  1. a Hawaii Hunter Education Wallet Card; OR
  2. a Letter of Exemption.

In case of 1., you’ve passed the Hawaii Hunter Education Class, then received a Hunter Certification Card. In the case of 2., that means you have received an out-of-state hunter education card or obtained a Hawaii Hunting License prior to July 1, 1990. Specifically, for non-residents you will need complete the non-resident Letter of Exemption Form and submit it as an application to DLNR. Obviously, once you submit your application the government will review, process, and ideally approve it. Like any government process, there will be additional procedures after approval. However, with approval you should be able to purchase a Hawaii hunting license. If you are a nonresident, then you will likely have to work with your local hunter education office to get certification or proof to be submitted to DLNR to obtain the Letter of Exemption.

Go Hunt, Hawaii, a DLNR website is the State’s official hunting resource and provides a schedule of classes to take basic Hunter Education as well as an easy to follow flowchart on the basics of hunting.

What if I am a Nonimmigrant Alien?

If you are coming to the United States and temporarily bringing firearms and ammunition into the United States, then the Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) has a FAQ to address these issues. Obviously, this is just a general FAQ and any specific concerns may require more planning and communication with the agency or others involved, such as your travel arrangements.

What About Bringing Firearms and Ammunition Into Hawaii?

Firearms and ammunition being brought into the state must be registered.

Firearms and ammunition brought into Hawaii must be registered within 48 hours after their arrival with the Chief of Police of the county of one’s residence, business or sojourn. So whatever islands you are heading to, you have to register your hunting weapons and ammunition. Understand that while DLNR regulates public lands, the regulation and enforcement of firearms happens at the county-level, so the police chiefs of the various counties have control. So you will want to contact the district police station on the island you are heading to or an office of the Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE).

What About Minors and Firearms?

Minors, those who are 15 years and younger, that are hunting with a firearm must obtain a permit from the county police department.

What if I am Disabled Hunter?

Those with disabilities are suggested by DLNR to review the vehicle permit application and the cross-bow permit application. There may be additional requirements and issues. Therefore, it would probably be best to contact DLNR.

Where Can I Hunt Boar in Hawaii?

Each island has different zones, animals, and other variables to go hunting. Check the DLNR rules and regulations.

Ok, once you’ve squared away your hunting license where can you go to hunt boars? Well, in terms of public lands feral pigs may be hunted on Hawaii (also known as the “Big Island”), Maui, Molokai, Oahu, and Kauai. There are special zones for public lands hunting. It is best to check maps and understand the terrain. To be specific DLNR provides the Game Mammal Hunting Rules as a downloadable PDF. If you go through these Hawaii Administrative Rules you will see a number of maps, charts, and exhibits that discusses each of the islands zones, hunting units, means of hunting, bag limits, open hunting periods, open hunting days, and special conditions and restrictions. It is quite explicit. In addition, they provide many of these charts and tables for each of the islands as follows:

Yes, Lanai has a page as well, but this post is concentrated on feral pig hunting.

What about Private Lands?

In addition to everything indicated prior, that is having a valid hunting license, doing your hunting during limited hours, you obviously need the permission of the landowner. The exception as to what is okay to hunt with, that is setting weapons and method, hunting fees, and special prohibits are set by the landowner. More on those topics ahead.

Whoever Goes Hunting Are They Required to Have Special Clothing?

Blaze orange garment is a must for anyone part of the hunt. Hawaii rules specific what is a must for this garment.

Yes, any person who goes on the hunt in a public hunting area basically needs to wear something specific. Think orange. That is whether the person is serving as a guide, accompanying or assisting the hunter, and the hunter themselves needs to be wearing an exterior blaze orange garment. The rules on this blaze orange garment are very specific, the point being safety. So the blaze orange garment while engaging in any of those hunting activities:

  1. may be a shirt, vest, coat or jacket;
  2. the material must be commercially manufactured and may be either solid or mesh with a maximum mesh size of one-eighth inch; and
  3. the use of camouflage orange is PROHIBITED.

Finally, these blaze orange garments are not required on designated archery only public hunting areas.

When Can I Hunt Boar? What Times During the Year and Day?

Game mammals (which includes feral pigs) may only be hunted from one-half hour prior to sunrise and until one-half hour after sunset. This is year-round. It is prohibited by law to hunt during one-half hour after sunset and one-half hour before sunrise. Basically, after the sun goes down and until rises again hunting is illegal. Again, much like the orange clothing requirement, safety is an issue.

How can I Hunt Boar? What Tools and Methods are Okay?

What about Using Flashlights?

So from the prior question and answer, you may be thinking what if we lit up the area? DLNR prohibits the use of any form of artificial light for hunting.

What about Dogs, Firearms, Bows and Crossbows or Melee weapons?

From DLNR’s Game Mammal Hunting page:

When hunting with dogs where permitted, hunters may use any muzzeloading rifle with a minimum of 0.45 caliber bore diameter; any rifle using at least a 0.22 caliber magnum load or center fire cartridge; shotguns loaded with slugs or 00 or larger buckshot or spears or knives. When hunting without dogs, hunters may use any rifle with a muzzle energy rating of 1,200 foot pounds or more; shotguns loaded with 00 or larger buckshot and muzzleloader rifles with a minimum of 0.45 caliber bore diameter (Breech loaders may not be used during muzzleloader only designated hunts). When hunting with a bow, the following drawing tension requirements are applicable: Long bows must have a minimum of 40 pounds at a 28-inch draw; Recurved bows must have a minimum of 35 pounds; Compound bows must have a minimum of 30 pounds.

Last Reminder: General Information and On Feral Pigs Only

Remember, we are only talking about feral pigs in this post, which falls under game mammals. Also much of this is general information provided on DLNR’s webpages, but when dealing with activities, such as hunting, then there are a lot of safety issues to deal with.  Additionally, for this post everything discussed here is on feral pigs. While some of these rules and regulations apply to other animals, such as feral goat – there are slightly different permit requirements for other game mammals. For example, deer, wallabies, and wild cattle are protected. Further, game birds are regulated both on public and private lands. So again, you are going to have to do some homework for those animals. Many people get turned away at the license agent’s counter due to being unaware or requirements. Research and plan ahead!

Good luck and good hunting! May you find the Year of the Boar prosperous and full of bounty!  As always, thanks for stopping by and reading.

-RKH

DISCLAIMER: This post provides general information, but does not constitute legal advice in any respect.  No reader should act or refrain from acting based on information contained in the post without seeking the advice of  an attorney in the relevant jurisdiction.  Hew & Bordenave, LLLP expressly disclaims all liability in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this post.

Dear Hawaii Small Business Owner I reach out to you on this post as …

A Small Law Firm Owner that Has Legislative Experience and Works with Businesses

I am letting you know that the Hawaii legislature has a number of minimum wage bills introduced this legislative session (2019). I am an owner and Managing Partner of a small law firm here in Honolulu, and of course any legislation that may impact my operations and my clients then I do have concerns. It is not only as business attorney, but as an owner as well. Additionally, I spent 4 legislative sessions as a legislative aide, committee clerk, and then attorney for the Hawaii House Labor, and then the Judiciary Committees. So therefore, I am in a unique position to share my concern via legalese, but also educate others as to the legislative process.

The Hearing Information and the Minimum Wage Bills

Having communicated that, I share the following:

  • The Hawaii Senate Committee on Labor, Culture and the Arts has scheduled a hearing. It is on Thursday, January 31 at 3:00 p.m. The following bills related to minimum wage are being heard: (A) SB 789; and (B) SB 1248. These two bills, as currently drafted, would: (A) increase the minimum wage to $12.00 per hour beginning 1/1/2022; and (B) provide an income tax credit for qualifying small businesses to offset the increase in the minimum hourly rate that employers must pay employees, and increase the minimum wage rate each year from 2020 through 2024.
  • Here is the Hearing Notice.

Note that the submitting of testimony for the hearing of bills may impact some legislators’ decisions on how to vote or recommend changes to a piece of legislation. As a constituency, Hawaii small business owners should be heard on matters that impact them. However, you have to write and submit the testimony to them to have it part of the process. Further, if you have time, then appearing in-person at the hearing may also be impactful. If you have questions on drafting and submitting testimony online, and/or testifying in person, then feel free to ask or email me at ryan@hewbordenave.com.

Thanks for reading this, now go submit some testimony and be a part of the Hawaii legislative process!

-RKH

UPDATE (2018/01/15): Included a PDF for the Hawaii State Department of Defense below.

Did You Know How to Respond to the Missile Threat?

We are glad that everyone is safe and that the emergency alert about a ballistic missile threat to Hawaii on January 13, 2018, which people received on their mobile devices and saw flash across their tv screens was just a mistake. However, seeing social media reactions as the situation unfolded it seems apparent we all could be better prepared. We hope that we never have to act on disaster plans, but wherever you live you could always take better steps to safeguard yourself, your family and friends, and your businesses and organizations.

Do you know what to do if you see this on your mobile device or tv?

I was fortunate enough to attend a Hawaii Society of Business Professional’s luncheon last fall that covered the topic of the threat from North Korea and what people and businesses should do to prepare. So I felt a little better prepared compared to the confusion I saw on social media this morning. However, faced with the reality I did ask myself, did I take all t he precautions I could?  Maybe, but also maybe not. While we should ask questions of our officials about how a mistake like this happened, this presents us all an opportunity. An opportunity for us to better prepare for emergencies.

Hawaii’s Emergency Management Agency

To that end I would like to direct your attention to the State of Hawaii’s Emergency Management Agency’s website. On it you will find a Get Ready section that has resources to help you prepare your family, your home, and your business. Those are resources for you to review in general for getting prepared for disaster in general. If you have concerns about the Nuclear Threat, the agency has a specific section dedicated to that here. Further, there is a FAQ and if you still have questions you can submit them to the agency for review and response.

Thank goodness there was no actual threat. However, it may be an opportunity to be prepared for disasters.

Additionally, Hawaii State Department of Defense and the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency provided a Guidance Summary for Coordinated Public Messaging that gives critical information for the Immediate Actions you should take in case of a nuclear detonation.

 

It was last revised on June 27, 2017. Direct link to PDF.

Planning Requires asking Questions

As you go through some of the resources, you will realize while there are a lot of practical steps, such as putting together an emergency kit by getting food, water, and medical supplies, a lot of planning is asking questions. Planning is that, whether it be strategic business planning or estate planning, we need to ask a lot of questions to get us to think of what we should do in a particular situation. Disaster planning is not any different: Do you have everything that you need for an emergency? Does everyone in your family know what to do in emergency? What if you are at home? What if you are at work?  And so forth …

On the one hand, we spend a lot of time planning for risk mitigation with clients, so we get it. It is sometimes hard putting in that mental time for thinking about the future. However, our firm’s other services include being a resource for clients and their businesses in going after claims for their injuries they’ve suffered in a disaster or asking for a release of obligation under a contract under a Force Majuere (Act of God) clause the reality is that work comes after. Bottom line is that your goal should be to keep yourself, family, business and community safe. So please consider steps to plan and prepare. Stay safe!

DISCLAIMER: This post provides general information, but does not constitute legal advice in any respect.  No reader should act or refrain from acting based on information contained in the post without seeking the advice of  an attorney in the relevant jurisdiction.  Hew & Bordenave, LLLP expressly disclaims all liability in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this post.