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What’s with All this Paperwork? Part IV Operating Agreements

Pardon the gap in my weekly posts, but I was away and setting up my new office.  This week I will be picking up right where I left off as we survey the documents that a startup founder will likely see as they launch a new business entity.

Quick Recap

Last time, I left off with the corporate bylaws.  Recall that a corporation must have bylaws, which is one of the formalities that face a corporation.  Remember that a LLC is a much more flexible entity and need not have an operating agreement, but will default to the rules provided in the statute.  For more on the differences click here.

So Why Draft an Operating Agreement?

Though you technically don’t need an operating agreement there are two practical realities that you face, which is why should get them drafted anyway.  (1) most major banks and financial institutions, as well as any possible investors (though usually they prefer corporations) will want to see your operating agreement.  (2) If you have a multi-member LLC the default rules are just that, they are default, and they may not capture the business relationship you have among your co-founders.  Further, I have recently had several clients lament to me they wish they had taken advantage of the flexibility of a LLC for getting rid of a lazy partner, getting a better handling of the profit/losses and distributions for tax reasons, etc . . . .

Shameless Self-Promotion: Read My One-Sheet!

So I provide this handy-dandy one-sheet that provides a topical overview of the LLC’s operating agreement.  I urge you read it when you have time.  However, as I appreciate you reading this post, today, I would like to cover things not in that one-sheet.

What is NOT Flexible for Laws Governing Operating Agreements?

So, while many people extoll the virtues of the flexibility of the LLC many people do not know what are the default provisions that cannot be changed by the written agreement.  They are non-waivable provisions and I have run into instances that one or a couple members of a startup would like to oust a lazy member, or someone tries to pull a fast one by drafting the operating agreement this not allowable by law.  So I’d like to cover two areas that come up from to time to time.

(1) Access to Information

When you are a tiny company with 2 or 3 founders trying to navigate your way in a deluge of information, massive competitors, and high costs it is easy to get lost in doing what you have to do and one founder takes over recordkeeping, in some ways becoming the overprotective librarian that does not want to let the kids borrow the books from the library.  This is not possible in a LLC.  No member may unreasonably restrict a member’s right to information or access to the records relating to the LLC’s business or its affairs.   Further, the member or the member’s attorney has every right to access the records so that they may exercise the rights and know their duties under the operating agreement.  So they must have the opportunity to inspect and the ability to copy records during ordinary business hours.  However, for the expense and time the LLC may impose a reasonable charge for furnishing and making copies of the records.

(2) Expulsion of a Member

Similar to family attorneys who oversee a prenuptial agreement and then must face the unpleasantness of divorce, I as a transaction attorney face the same, I happily help founders start their business, but every then and now I face the disappointment that the business relationship does not work out.  Expulsion of a member is  not automatic.  Often times, the interested members of the business just stop talking or communicating with the one they are seeking to oust. Do NOT do that, the member, even if they are lazy or have not shown up for a month, is still a member and has rights.  However, they also have duties.   Thus, the nonwaivable rules provide that the LLC or its members have the right to seek a judicial order to expulse the member for the following reasons:

  1. wrongful conduct hat adversely and materially affect the company’s business;
  2. willfully or persistently committed a material breach of the operating agreement or of a duty owed to the company or the other members or under the applicable law; or
  3. engaged in conduct relating to the company’s business which makes it not reasonably practicable to carry on the business with the member.

Last Word: Records Access for Former Members

This two nonwaivable provisions, which I just wrote about invariably sometimes brings up the discussion of former members.  They were once members and having been expulsed they are trying to clean things on their own end for personal reasons.  The LLC cannot still limit access to the records after they are gone.  However, the former member only has the limited right to access the information to when they were a member of the LLC.

*Disclaimer:  This post discusses general legal issues, but does not constitute legal advice in any respect.  No reader should act or refrain from acting based on information contained herein without seeking the advice of counsel in the relevant jurisdiction.  Ryan K. Hew, Attorney At Law, LLLC expressly disclaims all liability in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this post.


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FAQ: Should My Startup Issue Stock Certificates?

Sorry, no Draw the Law this week (or next week), as I am working on a something important.  I will announce what it is tomorrow.
As for today, this is a follow-up on a FAQ that a lot of founders and startup corporations ask me.  Should they issue stock certificates?

Is It Required by Law?

As I said last week, no. In Hawaii, a corporation, through its board of directors (under the authority of the articles of incorporation or bylaws) may issue shares without certificates.  In general, most, if not all jurisdictions, have done away with the requirement of a piece of paper signifying ownership in a corporation.

Even social media giant, Facebook, scrapped its plans earlier this year to issue paper stock certificate to its shareholders.  More and more companies are turning to electronic registration as a way to keep track of shares.

What about the Startups?

It’s true large, publicly traded corporations are moving away from the traditions of paper, but does that mean you should.  There are some attorneys who feel you should as it signifies ownership and allows a small group of founders to have a check on each other given the fluidic nature of startups.  Others embrace the digital and just say keep good electronic records and documentation.  Not to mention paper certificates are actually costly to print, which is an added cost your young corporation may not need.

For startups, the founding owners should discuss whether or not they want to issue paper certificates or not.  It really is a personal preference, as some people enjoy having the tangible proof of ownership and nostalgia of the paper.  In fact, Scripophily.com buys an sells original paper stocks for people interested in collecting.  Still others prefer the cheaper method, and just keep an electronic spreadsheet to keep track and just send updates.

If My Startup Decides to Issue Stock Certificates What Does it Require?

Hawaii Revised Statute §414-86 states the following required items to be on a stock certificate if you choose to issue them:

 (b)  At a minimum each share certificate must state on its face:

(1)  The name of the issuing corporation and that it is organized under the law of this State;

(2)  The name of the person to whom issued; and

(3)  The number and class of shares and the designation of the series, if any, the certificate represents.

(c)  If the issuing corporation is authorized to issue different classes of shares or different series within a class, the designations, relative rights, preferences, and limitations applicable to each class and the variations in rights, preferences, and limitations determined for each series (and the authority of the board of directors to determine variations for future series) must be summarized on the front or back of each certificate.  Alternatively, each certificate may state conspicuously on its front or back that the corporation will furnish the shareholder this information on request in writing and without charge.

(d)  Each share certificate:

(1)  Must be signed (either manually or in facsimile) by two officers designated in the bylaws or by the board of directors; and

(2)  May bear the corporate seal or its facsimile.

Last Word

Personally, on a practical level, I do not think you need them, but that isn’t a legal opinion.  It just has to do with startup expenses and printing out specialized paper may not be necessary and would only drive up your costs at the beginning when you need to focus on your business model.  However, in some cases it may be warranted, but everyone’s situation is different.  Therefore, consider speaking to an attorney to provide advice and their thoughts given your situation on this matter and all that other paperwork that you need!

*Disclaimer:  This post discusses general legal issues, but does not constitute legal advice in any respect.  No reader should act or refrain from acting based on information contained herein without seeking the advice of counsel in the relevant jurisdiction.  Ryan K. Hew, Attorney At Law, LLLC expressly disclaims all liability in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this post.

What’s with all this Paperwork? Part III Corporate Bylaws

Last week’s post was about the differences between the internal documents of bylaws and operating agreements, and what their purpose is as opposed to the Articles documents.  This week and next, I will take a closer look at the in-depth documents, bylaws and operating agreements, separately and mention a couple things that startups and small businesses should know about bylaws.

Adopting Bylaws are Required along with Certain Provisions

Recall last week that I mentioned as opposed to a LLC’s operating agreement, that a corporation’s incorporators or board of directors MUST adopt initial bylaws for the corporation.  However, what is also required are certain provisions that control how shareholders and directors behave with regard to the corporation.  Further, there are provisions that the owners of the company may consider.

*The Difference Between “May” and “Shall”

I don’t normally give grammar lessons on my blog, but when it comes to business law, especially corporate documents, many people get bored, confused, (sometimes angry), at the tedium of the words we use.  Thus the need for clarity in the matter.

Without getting into the mechanical linguistics of it all, when “shall” is used it is something that you MUST do, whereas “may” gives you the option of doing the act.  I am going to use an example when it comes to Annual Meetings.

You Must Have Annual Meetings, but You May or May Not State the Place of the Meetings

What does that mean?  Let me show you the relevant statute and break it down:

(a)  A corporation shall hold a meeting of shareholders annually at a time stated in or fixed in accordance with the bylaws.

(b)  Annual shareholders’ meetings may be held in or out of this State at the place stated in or fixed in accordance with the bylaws.  If no place is stated in or fixed in accordance with the bylaws, annual meetings shall be held at the corporation’s principal office.  Notwithstanding the foregoing, the bylaws may authorize the board of directors, in its sole discretion, to determine that the annual meeting shall not be held at any place, but may instead be held solely by means of remote communication as authorized under subsection (c).

So notice in section (a) it states that a corporation shall hold a meeting of shareholders each yeah and that the bylaws shall state that time.   However, notice in section (b) it states that these shareholders’ annual meetings may be in Hawaii or not, and that the bylaws may state this place. However, if you do not state a place it shall be the corporation’s principal office.

Please note that is just part of the “Meetings” statute as it is to the Hawaii Business Corporation Act.   What you should take away from it is that there are some provisions required in bylaws and there are others that you have flexibility with.

Why is this Relevant for People Starting a Business?

Yes, paperwork is tedious, but it also creates accountability and a method of controlling your business.  More often than not with a start-up there is the idea person, the money person, and the person who can engineer/produce/implement the idea.  With three people involved there has to be a way to control how the interact.  Further, once the business develops, the goal may be to seek more investment, and thus new additional owners of the corporation (shareholders) join the entity.  Thus the need for bylaws to dictate how this all operates.

Some Other Typical Provisions that Appear in the Bylaws

These other provisions are in no particular order, and some may or may not appear in the bylaws.  Further some of them may be required, and others just appear as it is customary.  The point for a business owner using a corporation should know that some of these things appear in your bylaws, the way you govern your business.

Sample Subjects of Bylaw Provisions:

  1. Special Meetings (as opposed to the Annual Meetings)
  2. Required Officers, Duties of Officers
  3. Record Date (this refers to what date a record reflects what shareholders are entitled to notice of a shareholders’ meeting)
  4. Number if Directors, Director qualifications and Duties
  5. Notice (how notice is given for certain circumstances)
  6. Stock Certificate Signatures
  7. Restriction on Transfer of Stock
  8. Shareholder Agreements

There are other provisions that more often than not appear in bylaws, but this is just meant as a sample.  Finally, please take heed you should consider seeking an expert’s help when drafting your bylaws, as this is a foundational document of your corporation.  I have seen many founders wanting to start fast and adopting poor or wrong bylaws, and then requiring “cleanup” work, which is often more costly and time-consuming after the fact of initial adoption.

*Disclaimer:  This post discusses general legal issues, but does not constitute legal advice in any respect.  No reader should act or refrain from acting based on information contained herein without seeking the advice of counsel in the relevant jurisdiction.  Ryan K. Hew, Attorney At Law, LLLC expressly disclaims all liability in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this post.

 

What’s with all this Paperwork? Part II Bylaws and Operating Agreements, Keep it In the House!

Quick reminder before I dive into this week’s Draw the Law, I have a talk under Pacific New Media on Social Media and that Law.  Check out the info here.
So last week I talked about Articles of Incorporation versus Articles of Organization.  Recall, that the former were for corporations, and the latter was for LLCs.  In addition, remember that these series of posts are meant to deal with a startup person’s guide to all the paperwork they have to deal with when forming a company.

This week is all about bylaws and operating agreements, which are internal documents as opposed to last week’s documents, where are what get filed with a state agency, so become a matter of public record.  One of the easiest analogies to get is that if the Articles are the birth certificate, then the bylaws or operating agreement represents the skeleton of the company.

Are these Documents Public?

As stated above, these documents are internal. That being said the government and institutions may require you to reveal them in order to do business.  Certain trades or industries a regulating agency may require the filing of your bylaws or operating agreement to do business. For example, to obtain a liquor license in the City and County of Honolulu a LLC must submit its operating agreement.  In addition, financial institutions, like banks (this is just an example of one local bank and is NOT an endorsement of them) will require you to submit your bylaws or operating agreement in order to open a business account.  Finally, for startups venture capital firms, potential investors, etc . . . will definitely want a look at your business structure and may even require you to change them to protect their interest.

So What are These Documents Used For?

Both bylaws and operating agreements are internal documents that guide the behavior among shareholders and members, respectively, as well as officers, directors, and managers.   The documents are contract, agreed upon by the owners at the onset of the company.   Therefore, if the rules are not abided by an offending shareholder, member, officer, director, or manager a breach of contract claim may exist for them not following the rules.

Do I Need to Have these Documents?

This question should show how LLCs are more flexible whereas corporations are more formal.  You must adopt an initial set of bylaws for the corporation you form if you are an incorporator or part of the board of director.  However, with the LLC you may enter an operating agreement with fellow co-members, if you don’t you will have the statute as your default rules for guiding the LLC.  This is one of several differences between the corporate structure versus that of a limited liability company.  As stated in previous posts and my law talk, corporations tend to be more formal, but sought after for startups due to investment and tax benefits whereas LLCs are used for their flexibility and ability to be less formal (thus less administrative costs), and that these differences can be seen when drafting these internal documents.

A Word on Negotiating and Drafting these Documents

Many times, startups and small business co-members like to create their own bylaws or operating agreement without an attorney.  What should be realized about this is that in both cases there are certain provisions that are not waivable.  Further, due to the formality of the corporation and the flexibility of the LLC the distribution of ownership, allocation of profit and losses, etc . . . is not necessarily something that should be done without advice and consulting.

In addition, many of people try to only use one attorney to draft a document that reflects the interest of people coming together for an endeavor. What they don’t realize is that is basically intended to be a long-term business deal and sometimes genuine disagreements amongst the starting owners of the company may force each of them to get an individual attorney to negotiate on their behalf.  Another misconception many people have is that they must adopt Robert’s Rules to guide their meetings in their bylaws or operating agreement because they see it on television or see another organization using them.  Remember I said that these documents are a contract?  Consider that if you fail to live up to your own agreed upon rules you are in breach of the company’s internal guiding document.  Finally, consider that these documents are NOT set in stone and operating agreements and bylaws usually have a method to amend them. Whether the process to amend them is easy or not is up to you.

On a personal note, I would like to impart I have dealt with several companies where the people started out friends and thought they could have an informal situation and ignored their own bylaws or operating agreement.  Then a falling out occurred, and well let’s just it was ugly. Others have tried to draft them on their own with disastrous results not realizing further legal work needs to be done when they want to sell the business or attract investors.

So next week, I will tackle bylaws, and some specifics about them, and the following week after that I will tackle operating agreements.

*Disclaimer:  This post discusses general legal issues, but does not constitute legal advice in any respect.  No reader should act or refrain from acting based on information contained herein without seeking the advice of counsel in the relevant jurisdiction.  Ryan K. Hew, Attorney At Law, LLLC expressly disclaims all liability in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this post.

It’s all About the Trade, Part II: What Constitutes a Trade Secret?

Congratulations to all winning teams at this past weekend’s Startup Weekend Honolulu.  I look forward to meeting you all. Good job by The Box Jelly for hosting a great event!
So last week was trade name versus trademark.  Today is another area that a lot of startups get confused.  They find a programmer, designer, consultant, and other similar professions to help them bring their idea to reality, but want them only as an independent contractor, and if they have enough capital, possibly an employee.  However, no ownership, thus how do they protect their most sacred moneymaking idea that they slaved over a weekend trying to pitch?

Make them sign a nondisclosure agreement (NDA), is usually the first conclusion, then when a Client comes to me to draft them a NDA. I then ask them what they want to protect with the NDA, and they then to proceed to tell me everything including the kitchen sink . . . isn’t everything internal a trade secret?

No, just because you don’t want your competition to know does not make it a trade secret.

So What IS a Trade Secret?

Where we start off with trade secrets is the legislative definition, which is found in Hawaii at HRS §482B-2. This is the definition section under the Uniform Trade Secrets act and it states the following:

“Trade secret” means information, including a formula, pattern, compilation, program device, method, technique, or process that:

(1)  Derives independent economic value, actual or potential, from not being generally known to, and not being readily ascertainable by proper means by, other persons who can obtain economic value from its disclosure or use; and

(2)  Is the subject of efforts that are reasonable under the circumstances to maintain its secrecy.

So right off the bat, the definition indicates why a lot of business owners feel they have a trade secret.  Their information is precious (to them), they created a “new” “method” or “technique” (which was tried already and the market doesn’t think it is valuable), etc . . . . As you can tell by my commentary in the parentheses a trade secret has to be more.

Let’s use the famous example of a trade secret The Coca-Cola Company’s formula for coca-cola. First, it satisfies the first element. It’s a formula.

Second, the formula must have an independent economic value from not being known. In this case, it is clear that it does. No one has successfully replicated Coke’s formula AND it’s major rival Pepsico does not have the same formula.  Through its distribution deals and keeping the formula unattainable by normal means (such as experimenting) they have built a beverage empire.

Lastly, Coke has kept this secret for so many years, which supports the last element, which is the efforts to maintain secrecy.  At this point it may be beyond reasonable, but the efforts by Coke to maintain the correct amounts to the formula are legendary.  From bank vaults, to shopping around to different suppliers, etc . . . you name it, they have probably created an elaborate strategy to foil would be corporate spies.

What does this Mean for a Startup?

If you want to make a sound NDA, then you need to know what your company is all about.  Before, you think that is easy, remember you have gone around itching the idea to get investors, employees, etc . . . what have you told them?  Remember it’s a balancing act of trying to sell the idea without giving up the process, the secret has to be generally not know.

This brings me to another situation where people rely on public data, government information, etc . . . I will give them they have come up with a clever way to put disparate knowledge together, but if someone can readily replicate that “cleverness” on their own their really isn’t anything to protect.

Finally, the shotgun approach to NDA use should not be your method of maintaining secrecy.  Medium and large companies go overboard and have their janitors sign them when the have no intention of enforcing it against them and they aren’t privy to the company’s core secrets.  So for you, don’t make everyone you come in contact sign it, especially investors. They aren’t going to do it.

The rule of thumb is what your trying to protect your core strength and are you deriving that strength because no one else has figured it out.  This includes things like next year’s marketing plan, your competition not knowing how you will expand your product lines is a) valuable b) it is not known and c) if you are keeping it under lock and key, encrypted files, etc . . .  then you do have a trade secret. Obviously, it will no longer be a secret as to when you role out these new product lines, but before that time you need they are worth protecting. Then on the NDA side you only make people sign one if they can make use of your idea on their own (i.e. an engineer who knows the process to make a new material).

Anyway, the lucky winners from Startup Weekend Honolulu will get this information in a lecture and more regarding contracts, HR, Internet laws, and organizing their company as part of their winning package as provided by my firm.  So I urge you participate in Startup Weekend, as you may be the one asking, can I protect my business idea?

*Disclaimer:  This post discusses general legal issues, but does not constitute legal advice in any respect.  No reader should act or refrain from acting based on information contained herein without seeking the advice of counsel in the relevant jurisdiction.  Ryan K. Hew, Attorney At Law, LLLC expressly disclaims all liability in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this post.


It’s all About the Trade, Part I: Trade name vs. Trademark

Last week, I discussed equitable remedies in breach of contract situations.  I would like to shift gears for a while and do some information specifically aimed at startups, as this upcoming weekend is Startup Weekend Honolulu at the Box Jelly, coworking space.  If you have not signed up, you can check out the info here, and recommend trying it once as it is a very unique experience and you meet a lot of people.
My goal with the next month’s worth of posts is to deal with frequent misconceptions by people who are starting up their business.

Anyway, this post and the next one is aimed and clearing up some of the notions about the various “trade” legal aspects. Namely, I will be discussing the difference between trade names and trademarks, and what is a trade secret. I frequently run across clients and people who are very confused when they first start out their business and it is crucial for your legal protection of your business that you get the differences.

Trade Name vs. Trademark: Explaining the Difference

A trade name is NOT the same as a trademark.  While, both are definitely a part of trade and business they both operate and serve different roles.  Let’s use an example to walk through the way these two legal concepts are different.

Let’s say Mr. Joey Nakamura wants to sell his specialty brand of shave ice.  Let’s say Mr. Nakamura ignores my very first Draw the Law post, and does not want to create some kind of business structure with limited liability.  Therefore, he is a sole proprietor, but he does not want to sell his specialty brand of shave ice under his personal name.  So he registers a trade name and does business as JN Specialty Shave Ice.  This is his trade name.

While, developing his shave ice Joey then decides to create several unique flavors that are his signature products.  So he creates the Joey Jabuticaba and Nakamura Nectarine and begins packaging and labeling the bottled flavors as such.  These products in the marketing world are his brand names, which are advertising and marketing terms, but in the legal world these are his trademarks.

Thus the difference is a trade name functions to identify the particular business, and for a lot of people they know this as “doing business as”, but the concept actually includes corporate, llc, partnership, and fictitious names.  It is simply the name you are using to identify your business.

Trademarks, are any words, names, symbols, or devices (or a combination of those things) that are used to identify and distinguish your goods from those of others and to indicate the source of the goods (or services for service marks), even if the source is unknown.

Where the Confusion Comes In

Why do people mix these two up?  Well, it is very easy because many businesses use their name to identify their goods and services, for instance here in Hawaii, “American Savings Bank” and “Hawaiian Airlines” both are a trade name and trademark.  Your name can function both as a trade name and as a trademark, so long as it does not infringe on the rights of another.  Furthermore, a single business can own dozens of different trademarks to identify their various brands.

Why is the Distinction is Important?

Well, for some starting businesses they start out and register a business, then want to use another name.  Therefore they register a trade name thinking they are protected from trademark infringement.  As shown above, they are different and function so.  Further, when you start using your trade name you may be giving rise to trademark infringement on your part.  That’s right your name may be causing confusion in the marketplace because it may exist as someone else’s registered trademark.   At that point you would have to get a new name, which as experienced marketers will tell you is a blow to your marketing strategy and will force a costly re-branding.

So be careful when choosing your business name and be careful on how you market your product or service. See you next week, when I talk about trade secrets.  Startup competitors I’d definitely say you might want to check that one out as well.

*Disclaimer:  This post discusses general legal issues, but does not constitute legal advice in any respect.  No reader should act or refrain from acting based on information contained herein without seeking the advice of counsel in the relevant jurisdiction.  Ryan K. Hew, Attorney At Law, LLLC expressly disclaims all liability in respect to any actions taken or not taken based on the contents of this post.

Social Media and the Law, as well as other Fun Legal Info

Well, it’s amazing isn’t it? The month of January of 2012 is almost done and so much has already happened. Here are some interesting social media and the law news that I found, as well as some other fun pieces to carry you over for the day until tomorrow’s Draw the Law.

Google and Privacy Concerns (this well continue to be an issue for 2012 for all Social Media)

Have you noticed that Goolge is making some major pushes lately?  Well come March 1 the search engine plans on doing a turnabout and begin combining information it collects about the user from various sites/services into a single profile. Definitely a privacy issue brewing, especially when the privacy officer has to issue statements. Click: Google to merge user data across its services – CNN.com You can also read the lengthy notification, which you keep bypassing when you log onto your Google+ page.

GPS = 4th Amendment “Search” as Determined by SCOTUS

For all of you interested in criminal law, like Marcus Landsberg criminal lawyer extraordinaire, notice that the Supreme Court- GPS Tracking Is Illegal Without Warrant. Basically, SCOTUS feels that the use of a GPS Tracking device is a “search” for the purposes of the 4th Amendment, thus cops must get a warrant.

Mutant Toys or Mutant Dolls? Yes, it Matters

This was a great listen if you love comic books and would like to theorize that certain superheroes are not human. Basically, the point of this podcast: Mutant Rights – Radiolab, was showing the importance of the word “doll” versus “toy” – you may not think it means much, but if you are an IP attorney and have an import business getting a cheaper rate for your action figures is a must and it all boils down to if a mutant is a human or not.

Department of Homeland Security Following Facebook Posts

Earlier this month DHS released a document stating it is monitoring social media and news sites. They cited federal law that they have to “provide situational awareness” to federal, state, local and tribal governments. You can read more about this here: DHS watching social media, news sites | Greeley Gazette.

NLRB Finds Certain Arbitration Clauses Violate Labor Laws

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has determined that mandatory arbitration agreements that prevent employees from joining together to pursue employment-related legal claims in any forum, whether in arbitration or in court violate federal labor laws. Check that announcement here: Board finds that certain mandatory arbitration agreements violate federal labor law.

Local Startup and Social Media Infromation

For you startup lovers, don’t forget tomorrow night will be Startup Hawaii kickoff. For more information, check it out here: Startup America Comes to Hawaii | Aloha StartUps. It will be at Bar 35 downtown. Definitely come on down if you started or are going to start a business!

Also check back at Alohastartups.com as I will be writing some future posts talking about Hawaii’s new legal non-profit aimed at helping entrepreneurs and startups, Business Law Corp. (businesslawcorps.org). I hope to get some interviews with the founders soon!

Finally, clear sometime in February as I will be getting down with Social Media and the Law as I will be trying to schedule a talk at The Greenhouse Innovation Hub and will be a panelists at Social Media Club Hawaii’s Creating a social media policy for business – what, how and when? event at Amuse Wine Bar on Feb. 21st. Hope to see you there!